Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a trace lister (DefaultTraceListener derived) to write a special format to the VS output window (so double click -> go to source works). I remove the standard VS output default trace listener and replace it with this one.
But I don't want this long format showing in my console so I have a separate ConsoleTraceLister derived listener to give a shorter version there. The issue is this also writes to VS output so in that window traces are doubled up.
How to stop a ConsoleTraceLister derived listener from writing to VS output window?

share|improve this question
    
Remove the default trace listener, either by .config or explicitly in code. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Hans Passant Dec 2 '11 at 18:05
    
@HansPassant Sorry I should have mention I have already removed the default trace listener. The issue is that the my console trace listener ALSO writes to VS output window. Ive updated the question to clarify. – Ricibob Dec 4 '11 at 11:15
    
What's with the separate listener? A simple way to stop this is to untick the hosting process in the Project + Properties, Debug tab. – Hans Passant Dec 4 '11 at 11:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

//here is somthing you can try not sure if it will help

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Diagnostics;


public class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        TextWriterTraceListener myWriter = new
        TextWriterTraceListener(System.Console.Out);
        Debug.Listeners.Add(myWriter);
        Debug.WriteLine("Test output 1 ");
        Stream myFile = File.Create("output.txt");
        TextWriterTraceListener myTextListener = new
        TextWriterTraceListener(myFile);
        Debug.Listeners.Add(myTextListener);
        Debug.WriteLine("Test output 2 ");


        if (!EventLog.SourceExists("Demo"))
        {
            EventLog.CreateEventSource("Demo", "Demo");
        }


        Debug.Listeners.Add(new EventLogTraceListener("Demo"));
        Debug.WriteLine("Test output 3 ");
        myWriter.Flush();
        myWriter.Close();
        myFile.Flush();
        myFile.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked - Ive edited your answer to clarify the solution - I hope thats ok. Cheers. – Ricibob Dec 4 '11 at 11:34
    
Not a problem I am glad that I could help – MethodMan Dec 5 '11 at 13:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.