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i'd like to know what exactly happens when i use reflection to call a method whose name i have as a string:

my $foo = Foo->new();
my $method = 'myMethod';
$foo->$method();

is ~20% slower than native call:

$foo->myMethod();

Any pointers to documentation about how perl's reflection is implemented would be helpful.

Thanks.

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3  
I think it's pretty obvious that instead of the op codes containing the reference to a particular method, it needs more instructions to look up the method in the symbol chain of the @ISA hierarchy and dispatch to that at runtime. –  Axeman Dec 2 '11 at 14:11
1  
@Axeman, method dispatch is dynamic — consider runtime @ISA (or symbol table) modification, re-blessing objects, etc. Additionally, perlobj describes method lookup as runtime-cached, which at first blush suggests that probing @ISA cannot account for the speed difference. –  pilcrow Dec 2 '11 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, I don't trust benchmarks I don't see. It's too easy to get them wrong. I benchmarked them myself.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

sub new { return bless({}, $_[0]); }
sub myMethod { }

my %tests = (
   rt => '$foo->$method()  for 1..1000;',
   ct => '$foo->myMethod() for 1..1000;',
);

$_ = 'use strict; use warnings; our $foo; our $method; ' . $_
   for values(%tests);

our $foo = __PACKAGE__->new();
our $method = 'myMethod';

cmpthese(-3, \%tests);

I can replicate your results.

     Rate   rt   ct
rt 1879/s   -- -19%
ct 2333/s  24%   --

(Rate is 1/1000th of actual rate.)

That does seem rather big, but percentages can be very misleading with something so fast. Let's look at the difference in absolute times.

Compile-time: 2333000 calls per second = 429 nanoseconds per call
Run-time:     1879000 calls per second = 532 nanoseconds per call
Difference:   103 nanoseconds per call.

Not that much. So where is that time spent?

$ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'$foo->myMethod()'     $ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'$foo->$method()'
1  <0> enter                                   =  1  <0> enter 
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{              =  2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <0> pushmark s                              =  3  <0> pushmark s
4  <#> gvsv[*foo] s                            =  4  <#> gvsv[*foo] s
                                               +  5  <#> gvsv[*method] s
5  <$> method_named[PV "myMethod"]             !  6  <1> method K/1
6  <1> entersub[t2] vKS/TARG                   =  7  <1> entersub[t3] vKS/TARG
7  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC                   =  8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK                                   =  -e syntax OK

It seems the only difference is an extra symbol table lookup. 100ns seems excessive for that. But to be sure, compare to something tiny, say like adding one.

$ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'my $y = $x;'     $ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'my $y = $x + 1;'
1  <0> enter                              =  1  <0> enter 
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{         =  2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <#> gvsv[*x] s                         =  3  <#> gvsv[*x] s
                                          +  4  <$> const[IV 1] s
                                          +  5  <2> add[t3] sK/2
4  <0> padsv[$y:1,2] sRM*/LVINTRO         =  6  <0> padsv[$y:1,2] sRM*/LVINTRO
5  <2> sassign vKS/2                      =  7  <2> sassign vKS/2
6  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC              =  8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK                              =  -e syntax OK

Plugging that code and our $x = 100; into the benchmark code above, we get

            Rate addition  baseline
addition  4839/s       --      -26%
baseline  6532/s      35%        --

(Rate is 1/1000th of actual rate.)

So,

Basline:    6553000/s = 153 nanoseconds per assignment
Addition:   4839000/s = 207 nanoseconds per assignment+addition
Difference:              54 nanoseconds per addition

So is it reasonable for a simple symbol table lookup to take twice as long as adding one? Probably, since it involves hashing a string and looking for a string in short linked list.

Do you really care about spending an extra 100ns here and there? No, I'm guessing.

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+1 for a long-winded "premature optimisation!" :-) –  Tanktalus Dec 2 '11 at 23:48
> perl -MO=Concise -e '$foo->$bar'
8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
7     <1> entersub[t3] vKS/TARG ->8
3        <0> pushmark s ->4
-        <1> ex-rv2sv sKM/1 ->5
4           <#> gvsv[*foo] s ->5
6        <1> method K/1 ->7             # ops to read $bar and then call method
-           <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->6       # 
5              <#> gvsv[*bar] s ->6     # 
-e syntax OK

> perl -MO=Concise -e '$foo->bar'
7  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
6     <1> entersub[t2] vKS/TARG ->7
3        <0> pushmark s ->4
-        <1> ex-rv2sv sKM/1 ->5
4           <#> gvsv[*foo] s ->5
5        <$> method_named[PV "bar"] ->6   # op to call the 'bar' method
-e syntax OK

In the first example, perl has to load the $bar variable, and then check to see if it contains a name or value that can be used as a method. Since the contents of $bar could change between calls, this lookup must be done each time.

In the second example, perl already knows that the string "bar" should be used as a method name, so this avoids loading the variable and checking its contents on each execution.

But you should not worry too much about a 20% percent speed difference between two native operations. Mainly because native operations are very fast, and any speed that they actually do require will quickly be dwarfed by the actual algorithm your code has to perform. In other words, unless you have isolated this issue as a hot spot with a code profiler, the speed difference has more pedagogical than practical importance.

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You could speed this up by using a method reference, ala :

$metref = \&{"Class::$method"};
$instance = new Class;
$instance->$metref(@args);

You could obviously use $metref = \&Class::myMethod instead if you knew the method name at compile time. There are also closures using sub { ... } which perl might treat more efficiently than your symbolic dereferencing. See this perlmonks discussion and perlref : Making References.

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5  
Better to write Class::->can($method) to obtain the coderef. It respects inheritance and works under strict. Also, $metref->($instance, @args) is even faster. –  Eric Strom Dec 2 '11 at 18:56

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