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I'm writing the code for a GUI (in C++), and right now I'm concerned with the organisation of text in lines. One of the problems I'm having is that the code is getting very long and confusing, and I'm starting to get into a n^2 scenario where for every option I add in for the texts presentation, the number of functions I have to write is the square of that. In trying to deal with this, A particular design choice has come up, and I don't know the better method, or the extent of the advantages or disadvantages between them:

I have two methods which are very similar in flow, i.e, iterate through the same objects, taking into account the same constraints, but ultimately perform different operations between this flow. For anyones interest, the methods render the text, and determine if any text overflows the line due to wrapping the text around other objects or simply the end of the line respectively.

These functions need to be copied and rewritten for left, right or centred text, which have different flow, so whatever design choice I make would be repeated three times.

Basically, I could continue what I have now, which is two separate methods to handle these different actions, or I could merge them into one function, which has if statements within it to determine whether or not to render the text or figure out if any text overflows.

Is there a generally accepted right way to going about this? Otherwise, what are the tradeoffs concerned, what are the signs that might indicate one way should be used over the other? Is there some other way of doing things I've missed?

I've edited through this a few times to try and make it more understandable, but if it isn't please ask me some questions so I can edit and explain. I can also post the source code of the two different methods, but they use a lot of functions and objects that would take too long to explain.

// EDIT: Source Code //

Function 1:

void GUITextLine::renderLeftShifted(const GUIRenderInfo& renderInfo) { if(m_renderLines.empty()) return;

Uint iL = 0;

Array2t<float> renderCoords;
renderCoords.s_x = renderInfo.s_offset.s_x + m_renderLines[0].s_x;
renderCoords.s_y = renderInfo.s_offset.s_y + m_y;
float remainingPixelsInLine = m_renderLines[0].s_y;

for (Uint iTO= 0;iTO != m_text.size();++iTO)
{
    if(m_text[iTO].s_pixelWidth <= remainingPixelsInLine)
    {
        string preview = m_text[iTO].s_string;

        m_text[iTO].render(&renderCoords);
        remainingPixelsInLine -= m_text[iTO].s_pixelWidth;
    }

    else
    {
        FSInternalGlyphData intData = m_text[iTO].stealFSFastFontInternalData();

        float characterWidth = 0;

        Uint iFirstCharacterOfRenderLine = 0;

        for(Uint iC = 0;;++iC)
        {
            if(iC == m_text[iTO].s_string.size()) 
            {
                // wrap up
                string renderPart = m_text[iTO].s_string;
                renderPart.erase(iC, renderPart.size());
                renderPart.erase(0, iFirstCharacterOfRenderLine);
                m_text[iTO].s_font->renderString(renderPart.c_str(), intData,
                    &renderCoords);
                break;
            }

            characterWidth += m_text[iTO].s_font->getWidthOfGlyph(intData,
                m_text[iTO].s_string[iC]);

            if(characterWidth > remainingPixelsInLine) 
            {
                // Can't push in the last character
                // No more space in this line

                // First though, render what we already have:

                string renderPart = m_text[iTO].s_string;
                renderPart.erase(iC, renderPart.size());
                renderPart.erase(0, iFirstCharacterOfRenderLine);
                m_text[iTO].s_font->renderString(renderPart.c_str(), intData,
                    &renderCoords);


                if(++iL != m_renderLines.size())
                {
                    remainingPixelsInLine = m_renderLines[iL].s_y;
                    renderCoords.s_x = renderInfo.s_offset.s_x + m_renderLines[iL].s_x;

                    // Cool, so now try rendering this character again
                    --iC;
                    iFirstCharacterOfRenderLine = iC;
                    characterWidth = 0;
                }
                else
                {

                    // Quit

                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

// Done! }

Function 2:

vector GUITextLine::recalculateWrappingContraints_LeftShift() { m_pixelsOfCharacters = 0;

float pixelsRemaining = m_renderLines[0].s_y;

Uint iRL = 0;

// Go through every text object, fiting them into render lines
for(Uint iTO = 0;iTO != m_text.size();++iTO)
{
    // If an entire text object fits in a single line
    if(pixelsRemaining >= m_text[iTO].s_pixelWidth)
    {
        pixelsRemaining -= m_text[iTO].s_pixelWidth;
        m_pixelsOfCharacters += m_text[iTO].s_pixelWidth;
    }

    // Otherwise, character by character
    else
    {
        // Get some data now we don't get it every function call
        FSInternalGlyphData intData = m_text[iTO].stealFSFastFontInternalData();

        for(Uint iC = 0; iC != m_text[iTO].s_string.size();++iC)
        {
            float characterWidth = m_text[iTO].s_font->getWidthOfGlyph(intData, '-');

            if(characterWidth < pixelsRemaining)
            {
                pixelsRemaining -= characterWidth;
                m_pixelsOfCharacters += characterWidth;
            }

            else // End of render line! 
            {
                m_pixelsOfWrapperCharacters += pixelsRemaining; // we might track how much wrapping px we use

                // If this is true, then we ran out of render lines before we ran out of text. Means we have some overflow to return
                if(++iRL == m_renderLines.size())
                {
                    return harvestOverflowFrom(iTO, iC);
                }

                else
                {
                    pixelsRemaining = m_renderLines[iRL].s_y;
                }
            }
        }

    }
}

vector<GUIText> emptyOverflow;
return emptyOverflow; }

So basically, render() takes renderCoordinates as a parameter and gets from it the global position of where it needs to render from. calcWrappingConstraints figures out how much text in the object goes over the allocated space, and returns that text as a function.

m_renderLines is an std::vector of a two float structure, where .s_x = where rendering can start and .s_y = how large the space for rendering is - not, its essentially width of the 'renderLine', not where it ends.

m_text is an std::vector of GUIText objects, which contain a string of text, and some data, like style, colour, size ect. It also contains under s_font, a reference to a font object, which performs rendering, calculating the width of a glyph, ect.

Hopefully this clears things up.

share|improve this question
    
I'm also unsure if this belongs here or on programmers, so please feel free to vote to move – Tomas Cokis Dec 2 '11 at 14:50
    
Can't you just pass a pointer to the function that handles text into a function that does common thing? This can be addressed C way, std::function/lambda way, or trough some metamorphism. It is hard to tell what would be the easiest thing unless you show some code demonstrating your struggles. – user405725 Dec 2 '11 at 14:55
    
I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean, but I'll post my code in, with some explinations – Tomas Cokis Dec 2 '11 at 14:57
2  
@Tomas It's a vote to close and move. – Etienne de Martel Dec 2 '11 at 15:01
1  
Without reading carefully, I might suggest you think about how the standard library separates containers and algorithms, which reduces the order of code growth from quadratic to linear. – Kerrek SB Dec 2 '11 at 15:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no generally accepted way in this case. However, common practice in any programming scenario is to remove duplicated code. I think you're getting stuck on how to divide code by direction, when direction changes the outcome too much to make this division. In these cases, focus on the common portions of the three algorithms and divide them into tasks.

I did something similar when I duplicated WinForms flow layout control for MFC. I dealt with two types of objects: fixed positional (your pictures etc.) and auto positional (your words).

In the example you provided I can list out common portions of your example.

Write Line (direction)

  • bool TestPlaceWord (direction) // returns false if it cannot place word next to previous word
  • bool WrapPastObject (direction) // returns false if it runs out of line
  • bool WrapLine (direction) // returns false if it runs out of space for new line.

Each of these would be performed no matter what direction you are faced with.

Ultimately, the algorithm for each direction is just too different to simplify anymore than that.

share|improve this answer

How about an implementation of the Visitor Pattern? It sounds like it might be the kind of thing you are after.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a reasonable solution, although I'm concerned it might introduce more complexity – Tomas Cokis Dec 2 '11 at 15:14

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