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I need to do some simulations and for debugging purposes I want to use set.seed to get the same result. Here is the example of what I am trying to do:

library(foreach)
library(doMC)
registerDoMC(2)

set.seed(123)
a <- foreach(i=1:2,.combine=cbind) %dopar% {rnorm(5)}
set.seed(123)
b <- foreach(i=1:2,.combine=cbind) %dopar% {rnorm(5)}

Objects a and b should be identical, i.e. sum(abs(a-b)) should be zero, but this is not the case. I am doing something wrong, or have I stumbled on to some feature?

I am able to reproduce this on two different systems with R 2.13 and R 2.14

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

My default answer used to be "well then don't do that" (using foreach) as the snow package does this (reliably!) for you.

But as @Spacedman points out, Renaud's new doRNG is what you are looking for if you want to remain with the doFoo / foreach family.

The real key though is a clusterApply-style call to get the seeds set on all nodes. And in a fashion that coordinated across streams. Oh, and did I mention that snow by Tierney, Rossini, Li and Sevcikova has been doing this for you for almost a decade?

Edit: And while you didn't ask about snow, for completeness here is an example from the command-line:

edd@max:~$ r -lsnow -e'cl <- makeSOCKcluster(c("localhost","localhost"));\
         clusterSetupRNG(cl);\
         print(do.call("rbind", clusterApply(cl, 1:4, \
                                             function(x) { stats::rnorm(1) } )))'
Loading required package: utils
Loading required package: utils
Loading required package: rlecuyer
           [,1]
[1,] -1.1406340
[2,]  0.7049582
[3,] -0.4981589
[4,]  0.4821092
edd@max:~$ r -lsnow -e'cl <- makeSOCKcluster(c("localhost","localhost"));\
         clusterSetupRNG(cl);\
         print(do.call("rbind", clusterApply(cl, 1:4, \
                                             function(x) { stats::rnorm(1) } )))'
Loading required package: utils
Loading required package: utils
Loading required package: rlecuyer
           [,1]
[1,] -1.1406340
[2,]  0.7049582
[3,] -0.4981589
[4,]  0.4821092
edd@max:~$ 

Edit: And for completeness, here is your example combined with what is in the docs for doRNG

> library(foreach)
R> library(doMC)
Loading required package: multicore

Attaching package: ‘multicore’

The following object(s) are masked from ‘package:parallel’:

    mclapply, mcparallel, pvec

R> registerDoMC(2)
R> library(doRNG)
R> set.seed(123)
R> a <- foreach(i=1:2,.combine=cbind) %dopar% {rnorm(5)}
R> set.seed(123)
R> b <- foreach(i=1:2,.combine=cbind) %dopar% {rnorm(5)}
R> identical(a,b)
[1] FALSE                     ## ie standard approach not reproducible
R>
R> seed <- doRNGseed()
R> a <- foreach(i=1:2,combine=cbind) %dorng% { rnorm(5) }
R> b <- foreach(i=1:2,combine=cbind) %dorng% { rnorm(5) }
R> doRNGseed(seed)
R> a1 <- foreach(i=1:2,combine=cbind) %dorng% { rnorm(5) }
R> b1 <- foreach(i=1:2,combine=cbind) %dorng% { rnorm(5) }
R> identical(a,a1) && identical(b,b1)
[1] TRUE                      ## all is well now with doRNGseed()
R> 
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Thanks for example with snow. I am not well versed in intricacies of parallel programming in R, so I started using foreach for its painless transition from non-parallel code to parallel. I knew that I was missing something. –  mpiktas Dec 2 '11 at 18:14
2  
Well, that's why we all started years ago with snow as the transition from the standard *apply() functions to parallel ones was easy :) –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Dec 2 '11 at 18:41

Is the doRNG package any use to you? I suspect your problem is due to two threads both splatting the random seed vector:

http://ftp.heanet.ie/mirrors/cran.r-project.org/web/packages/doRNG/index.html

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Thanks for your answer, I really would have like to mark both as an answer, but Dirk's answer was more extensive. I've upvoted your answer nevertheless, since it contains enough information to solve my problem. –  mpiktas Dec 2 '11 at 18:16

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