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I have what I'm pretty sure is a bug in the optimizer in Visual studio 2005. The problem is with an STL map.

Here's the relevant code:

MyMapIterator myIt = m_myMap.find(otherID);

if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A)
{
	//Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}
else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second.foo == FOO_A)
{
	//Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}
else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second.foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
{
	//Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}

Works flawlessly in debug, used to crash in release, and disabling global optimizations "fixed it" Now, nothing works. I get a:

Microsoft Visual Studio C Runtime Library has detected a fatal error in [...]

Press Break to debug the program or Continue to terminate the program.

This happens on the first MyMapIterator::operator-> of the last else if

The map is empty, I know that find should have returned end(), The first two comparisons to that effect work. But somehow, the third time 'myIt != m_myMap.end()' returns true, and the right side of the && is executed.

Various other places fail like this with a variant of 'myIt != m_myMap.end()' returning true in that same file, but this is, to me, the one that rules out most other possibilities. I used to think it was a buffer overflow that was stomping on my map, but take a look back at the code. I am positive that no other thread is stomping on it, and this is 100% reproductible.

So, what do I do from here. This is not performance sensitive in the slightest. I just need it to work as it should. Any option is acceptable. Yes I know I could surround the whole thing with the iterator equality check and it isn't the nicest code. The point is, it should still work, and if that fails, anything else can.

EDIT

The last else-if doesn't generate any jump !

    if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A)
009270BE  mov         ecx,dword ptr [this] 
009270C4  add         ecx,0Ch 
009270C7  lea         eax,[ebp-90h] 
009270CD  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::end (8A21E0h) 
009270D2  mov         esi,eax 
009270D4  lea         edi,[myIt] 
009270D7  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::const_iterator::operator!= (8A2220h) 
009270DC  movzx       ecx,al 
009270DF  test        ecx,ecx 
009270E1  je          lux::Bar::DoStuff+0E4h (927154h) 
009270E3  lea         esi,[myIt] 
009270E6  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::iterator::operator-> (8A21F0h) 
009270EB  cmp         dword ptr [eax+8],1 
009270EF  jne         lux::Bar::DoStuff+0E4h (927154h) 
    {
         Stuff
    }
    else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B)
00927154  mov         ecx,dword ptr [this] 
0092715A  add         ecx,0Ch 
0092715D  lea         eax,[ebp-98h] 
00927163  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::end (8A21E0h) 
00927168  mov         esi,eax 
0092716A  lea         edi,[myIt] 
0092716D  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::const_iterator::operator!= (8A2220h) 
00927172  movzx       edx,al 
00927175  test        edx,edx 
00927177  je          lux::Bar::DoStuff+17Ah (9271EAh) 
00927179  lea         esi,[myIt] 
0092717C  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::iterator::operator-> (8A21F0h) 
00927181  cmp         dword ptr [eax+8],2 
00927185  jne         lux::Bar::DoStuff+17Ah (9271EAh) 
    {
            //Stuff
     }
    else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_C)
009271EA  mov         ecx,dword ptr [this] 
009271F0  add         ecx,0Ch 
009271F3  lea         eax,[ebp-0A0h] 
009271F9  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::end (8A21E0h) 
009271FE  mov         esi,eax 
00927200  lea         edi,[myIt] 
00927203  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::const_iterator::operator!= (8A2220h) 
00927208  lea         esi,[myIt] 
0092720B  call        std::_Tree<std::_Tmap_traits<unsigned __int64,lux::Foo,std::less<unsigned __int64>,std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned __int64 const ,lux::Foo> >,0> >::iterator::operator-> (8A21F0h) 
    {
            //Stuff in the condition and after
share|improve this question
    
Looks like a Heisenbug, post some more code (a minimal compilable version). –  dirkgently May 7 '09 at 16:49
    
A minimum compilable version is not possible since it doesn't reproduce the bug. This code hasn't changed in months, used to work fine. I cannot reproduce it outside this file. It randomly disappears when unrelated files in the project are updated and I recompile. Sometimes, Rebuild Solution fixes it. But randomly, some find calls into this more often than not empty map fail. They are 100% reproductible for a given compilation, but can disappear during the next. –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 16:55
    
Did you try to reorganize your code to have nested if's with a simple "if(myIt != m_myMap.end())" branch that contains all the other if's? It may help finding the problem. –  lothar May 7 '09 at 17:02
1  
Definitely sounds weird. One question: what's the data type of MyMap? The reason I ask is that it appears to have a public member (userStatus) as well as an operator->(). Just want to make sure operator->() is really side-effect free. –  David Joyner May 7 '09 at 17:11
2  
"The last else-if doesn't generate any jump !" - Looks like you've got a legitimate compiler bug. I think Microsoft needs to be told about this - particularly if you can determine that it also happens in VS2008 SP1 - but they may have info for you even if it has been fixed subsequent to VS2005. If you're on MSDN or otherwise have support incidents, I'd give them a call (since I think you'll be able to prove it's a bug, they should ultimately not charge you for the incident). –  Michael Burr May 7 '09 at 19:24
show 5 more comments

9 Answers 9

I suspect you have code elsewhere that has a buffer over run in it.

This other code is managing to wreck the memory that the posted code is using.

In debug mode the extra memory padding will change the behavior.

Changing other random code will also change the behaviour as it will shift the relative position of things.

Basically you'll need to review a lot of code or use a tool like BoundsChecker to find the error.

Concentrate on arrays or any raw pointer maths. Also any use of deleted pointers.

Bugs like this can hide for a long time if they write to place that doesn't cause a crash. For the same reason they often mysteriously disappear.

share|improve this answer
    
I have canaries around, they don't get overwritten. The first two comparisons work and the third fails withtout ANY opportunity for buffer overruns in between. –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:19
    
how many lines of code have executed between the map being created and the posted code running? –  morechilli May 7 '09 at 17:22
add comment
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well guys. After much pain and tears. To fix it at least temporarily I had to rework the code a bit to the form suggested by most people, which is how it should have been in the first case:

if (myIt != m_myMap.end())
{
    if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A) 
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_A)
    {        
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
}

However, the bug was still present. This gem fixed it:

if (myIt != m_myMap.end())
if (myIt != m_myMap.end())
{
    if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A) 
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_A)
    {        
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
}

Yes. Doubling the if resulted in a jump instruction being emitted after the test.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ouch... Any idea if this bug still exists in VS2005 SP1 or later? Have you talked to Microsoft and have they had anything to say? –  Michael Burr May 14 '09 at 15:15
add comment

It seems likely that you have some other condition in code you've not shown that is causing the map to be populated with some invalid data.

Try dumping out the contents of the map before your call to find(), and have a look for any possible uninitialized values in the rest of the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi James. I know it is not invalid data because I cannot 'dereference' the iterator. When I look at the memory, myIt->first is 0, which is different from what I searched for AND does not appear to be end() since the right-hand part is evaluated. –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:06
add comment

obviously anything can have bug, even the VC compiler. so if there is a bug in this section of code, you could wrap it in a #pragma to turn optimisations off. IF it still crashes after that, then something else in your code is trashing your map (and then you need to turn on DrWatson to get dumps so you can inspect the crash in windbg to try and find out what's happened to it).

To turn off optimisation use:

#pragma optimize("g", off)

to turn it back on, either change off to on or use the special case

#pragma optimize("", on)

which resets your optimisation settings to the project defaults.

share|improve this answer
    
Like I said, that USED to work, but doesn't. It is surrounded exactly by that right now :) –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:07
    
Actually, what I think you want is #pragma optimize( "", off ) #pragma optimize( "", on ) Note the empty "" in both cases -- this turns off all optimizations, then resets to the compiler defaults. –  Dan Breslau May 7 '09 at 19:09
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The optimizer really messes up your debugging info. There's a very good chance that the line that's actually failing on a different, nearby line. Even if the debugger is telling you that the exception is occurring on the second half of the && operator, it probably isn't.

To diagnose the real problem, you may wish the break up the last if statement into something like:

else if (myIt != m_myMap.end())
{
    printf("TEST 1\n");
    if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
}

printf("TEST 2\n");

If you get an output of "TEST 1", then there's something wrong with your iterator. If you get an output of "TEST 2" and then a crash, then obviously the error is occurring in the subsequent code. If neither "TEST 1" nor "TEST 2" prints and it still crashes there, then something is really wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Test1 prints, something is wrong with the iterator. The point is, there shouldn't. I just did a find on the map. The returned iterator should be valid and its a POD struct. –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:21
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I think I ran into this exact same problem.

Only seems to happen in x64 release (full optimization). My STL map is confirmed empty (size() == 0), but this line of code doesn't detect the empty map and instead goes into the for loop:

typedef std::map<std::string,std::string> KeyValueMap;

printf( "size: %d\n", ExtraHeaders.size() ); // prints "size: 0"

for( KeyValueMap::iterator it= ExtraHeaders.begin(); it != ExtraHeaders.end(); it++ )
{
    // this line is executed
    printf( "%s\t%s\n", (*it).first.c_str(), (*it).second.c_str() );
}

Feels like a compiler bug to me.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes I know I could surround the whole thing with the iterator equality check and it isn't the nicest code. The point is, it should still work, and if that fails, anything else can.

Of course, with that logic you have no options... Anything you do is a workaround.

I think my first approach would be to wrap the stuff in a block that's verified that myIt is valid:

if (myIt != m_myMap.end())
{
    if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A) 
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_A)
    {        
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
    else if (myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
    {
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I guess I should have said: "I want to know what can explain this before I rewrite it." –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:19
    
OK, that makes sense. - I think you've got a compiler bug on your hands. I didn't find anything like this reported on connect.microsoft.com (but I'm not sure that means much). I think you'll need to talk to Microsoft to get the low-down on this (maybe it's a bug even they don't know about yet). –  Michael Burr May 7 '09 at 19:33
add comment

I think you're making an assumption that's probably false: that the crash happens after having successfully checked myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus in the same iteration. I'd bet that the crash immediately follows the first time these values are examined. It's the optimizer that makes it look like you've cleared the first two if conditions.

Try putting a completely different code block into the loop and see if it crashes there (my bet is that it would -- I don't think you'll see the output from cerr immediately preceding a crash.)

// New code block
MyMapIterator yourIt = m_myMap.find(otherID);
if (yourIt != m_myMap.end() && yourIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A || 
     yourIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B)
{
        cerr << "Hey, I can print something! " << std::ios::hex << this << endl;
}

// Original code
MyMapIterator myIt = m_myMap.find(otherID);
if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_A)
{
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}
else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_A)
{
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}
else if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_B && /*other meaningless conditions */)
{
        //Prints stuff.  No side-effects whatsoever.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Global optimizations are disabled. I can step trough right into the STL implementation, altough it's not too clear what's going on in there, since this is optimized. It's a bit of a stretch to see it go in the comparison and exit if it hasn't run succesfully because the debug info is trashed, unless I'm mistaken –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:34
    
Disabling global optimizations may not make a difference, if you've got local optimizations turned up. If I'm not mistaken, the compiler is allowed to bypass multiple calls to non-volatile const() methods, and it probably does in this case. I'm not sure what you mean by "It's a bit of a stretch to see it go in the comparison and exit if it hasn't run succesfully because the debug info is trashed, unless I'm mistaken". I didn't suggest you exit, just that you run through a different block of code as a test, then dive into the main block. Please give it a try. –  Dan Breslau May 7 '09 at 18:02
    
On a completely different note: Have you installed SP1 for VS2005? See support.microsoft.com/kb/925792 . –  Dan Breslau May 7 '09 at 18:24
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if (myIt != m_myMap.end() && myIt->second.userStatus == STATUS_B && myIt->second->foo == FOO_A)

Why are you accessing userStatus with . and foo with -> ?

share|improve this answer
    
Typo durin anonymization. You might also notice that the generated code differ slightly since I'm making changes in the at the same time. Still the gist of it is there. –  jfclavette May 7 '09 at 17:37
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