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Let's say I have a class Foo. The class should store an array of Foo. I thought this would work:

class Foo
{
private:
    Foo *myArray[];
    //...
public:
    Foo()
}

Foo::Foo()
{
    myArray = new Foo [10];
}

But it doesn't. Any suggestions on what I am missing?

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3  
You have created infinate recursion here. Since the default constructor is called each time you create a new Foo, and the constructor creates more Foos it is just going to keep creating Foos until you run out of stack or memory. –  user957902 Dec 2 '11 at 15:09
1  
woulnd't std::vector<Foo> be easier? –  SingleNegationElimination Dec 2 '11 at 15:10
    
Whyyy? That's the same as asking for "an object of class X which contains a member object of class X". –  Kerrek SB Dec 2 '11 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are two problems with this code. First, your array declaration syntax is incorrect and throws an error during compilation. You should declare the array pointer like this:

Foo* myArray;

Secondly, if you attempt to instantiate a Foo object, you will create an infinite loop. This is because the new keyword will call the default constructor of the objects it's creating. For every Foo you instantiate, 10 more will be instantiated in the constructor, which will in turn each create 10 more Foo objects. You can solve this by having a separate method in your class which instantiates the array and which is hopefully not always called on every Foo object.

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+1 for pointing out "Secondly, if you attempt to instantiate a Foo object, you will create an infinite loop. This is because the new keyword will call the default constructor of the objects it's creating". I overlooked this problem! –  Nawaz Dec 2 '11 at 15:21

On a side note, you should avoid having fields of type Foo in a Foo class, because that will create an infinite creation loop. I assume that this is just sample code and that your actual code does not look like that.

As for your actual problem, this:

Foo *myArray[];

Declares an array of pointers. If you want an array of objets, then you have a couple of options.

If the amount of objects is known at compile time, then you can use a C array:

Foo myArray[10];

If you have a C++11 compiler, you can use std::array (or boost::array in C++98/03):

std::array<Foo, 10> myArray;

If you don't know the size, then of course you're going to have to use dynamic allocation. However, I strongly suggest that you don't do the allocation yourself, but rather leave it to somebody else, like std::vector:

std::vector<Foo> myArray;
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