Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to return multiple values in my case statement, such as :

SELECT
  CASE
    WHEN <condition 1> THEN <value1=a1, value2=b1>
    WHEN <condition 2> THEN <value1=a2, value2=b2>
    ELSE <value1=a3, value3=b3>
  END
FROM <table>

Of course I can write the case condition multiple times, each time return one value. However, as I have many condition need to fit, say 100. It is not good to repeat case condition again and again.

Another question I would like to ask, what happend if one record fit multiple condition? does that mean it will return all of them or just the last one? e.g. condition 1 may become a subset of condition 2. what will happen?

share|improve this question
    
Is this MS SQL Server? –  MatBailie Dec 2 '11 at 15:36
    
yes, it is...... –  yzhang Dec 2 '11 at 15:38
    
Can you clarify your scenario? For example, do the 100 different case conditions lead to 100 different applicable values for each of value1 and value2, or will many of the 100 different conditions produce the same results? Are the conditions all completely combinations of differing fields, or are they different possible values of a single field? –  Mark Bannister Dec 2 '11 at 15:40
    
Yes, 100 different case condition lead to 100 different values for each value1 and value2. The conditions all combination of different fields.. many thanks –  yzhang Dec 2 '11 at 15:50
    
@yzhang : Are the results fixed? In that, every row that matches condition 1 will always have the exact same values in value1 and value2? –  MatBailie Dec 2 '11 at 15:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The basic way, unfortunately, is to repeat yourself.

SELECT
  CASE WHEN <condition 1> THEN <a1> WHEN <condition 2> THEN <a2> ELSE <a3> END,
  CASE WHEN <condition 1> THEN <b1> WHEN <condition 2> THEN <b2> ELSE <b3> END
FROM 
  <table> 

Fortunately, most RDBMS are clever enough to NOT have to evaluate the conditions multiple times. It's just redundant typing.


In MS SQL Server (2005+) you could possible use CROSS APPLY as an alternative to this. Though I have no idea how performant it is...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  <table>
CROSS APPLY
  (
   SELECT a1, b1 WHERE <condition 1>
   UNION ALL
   SELECT a2, b2 WHERE <condition 2>
   UNION ALL
   SELECT a3, b3 WHERE <condition 3>
  )
  AS case_proxy

The noticable downside here is that there is no ELSE equivalent and as all the conditions could all return values, they need to be framed such that only one can ever be true at a time.


EDIT

If Yuck's answer is changed to a UNION rather than JOIN approach, it becomes very similar to this. The main difference, however, being that this only scans the input data set once, rather than once per condition (100 times in your case).


EDIT

I've also noticed that you may mean that the values returned by the CASE statements are fixed. All records that match the same condition get the exact sames values in value1 and value2. This could be formed like this...

WITH
  checked_data AS
(
  SELECT
    CASE WHEN <condition1> THEN 1
         WHEN <condition2> THEN 2
         WHEN <condition3> THEN 3
         ...
         ELSE                   100
    END AS condition_id,
    *
  FROM
    <table>
)
,
  results (condition_id, value1, value2) AS
(
   SELECT 1, a1, b1
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 2, a2, b2
   UNION ALL
   SELECT 3, a3, b3
   UNION ALL
   ...
   SELECT 100, a100, b100
)
SELECT
  *
FROM
  checked_data
INNER JOIN
  results
    ON results.condition_id = checked_data.condition_id
share|improve this answer

A CASE statement can return only one value.

You may be able to turn this into a subquery and then JOIN it to whatever other relations you're working with. For example (using SQL Server 2K5+ CTEs):

WITH C1 AS (
  SELECT a1 AS value1, b1 AS value2
  FROM table
  WHERE condition1
), C2 AS (
  SELECT a2 AS value1, b2 AS value2
  FROM table
  WHERE condition2
), C3 AS (
  SELECT a3 AS value1, b3 AS value2
  FROM table
  WHERE condition3
)
SELECT value1, value2
FROM -- some table, joining C1, C2, C3 CTEs to get the cased values
;
share|improve this answer
    
Rather than joining (probably outer joins with coalesce statements), you probably what to UNION these together. With the assumption that only one condition is ever true for any given input record. Even then, this would involve scaning the source data set once for every condition, and so having 100 scans of the data. –  MatBailie Dec 2 '11 at 15:43
    
@Dems: Yes, that would work as well. The ELSE condition in the OP question is written ELSE <value1=a3, value3=b3>, so the columns aren't all identical. I "fixed" that in my answer, but it may not be a typo. –  Yuck Dec 2 '11 at 15:45
    
Good spot, I wouldn't assume a typo, it may be relevent, and so require NULLs in value2 for other results. –  MatBailie Dec 2 '11 at 15:46

CASE by definition only returns a single value. Ever.

It also (almost always) short circuits, which means if your first condition is met no other checks are run.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Are there any conditions where it doesn't short-circuit? –  Mark Bannister Dec 2 '11 at 15:41
    
@MarkBannister - yes but they are buggy (in SQL Server). Basically the only circumstance I have seen is where you do a comparison against an aggregate of a variable (CASE WHEN MAX(@var)...). It will evaluate them all but still return the right value. –  JNK Dec 2 '11 at 15:43

In your case you would use two case staements, one for each value you want returned.

share|improve this answer

In a SQL CASE clause, the first successfully matched condition is applied and any subsequent matching conditions are ignored.

share|improve this answer

You could use a subselect combined with a UNION. Whenever you can return the same fields for more than one condition use OR with the parenthesis as in this example:

SELECT * FROM
  (SELECT val1, val2 FROM table1 WHERE (condition1 is true) 
                                    OR (condition2 is true))
UNION
SELECT * FROM
  (SELECT val5, val6 FROM table7 WHERE (condition9 is true) 
                                    OR (condition4 is true))
share|improve this answer
    
And for the other 99 conditions? (This give 2 fields, but only for 1 condition) –  MatBailie Dec 2 '11 at 16:18
    
Use UNION, one subquery per condition. –  Angelo Fuchs Dec 3 '11 at 22:34
    
@Dems: Also you could use 'OR' here, (I edit my example to fit it) –  Angelo Fuchs Dec 3 '11 at 22:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.