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Isn't there a convenient way of getting from a java.util.Date to a XMLGregorianCalendar?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 609 down vote accepted
GregorianCalendar c = new GregorianCalendar();
c.setTime(yourDate);
XMLGregorianCalendar date2 = DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendar(c);
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27  
I would not consider three line convenient - but I guess it is the best there is. Java, the language which turns boilerplate code to an art. –  Martin Jan 29 '13 at 15:11
2  
Is it save to keep the getInstance() as a static variable in some converter class? I tried to look it up in the JavaDoc but couldn't find anything. Kinda hard to know if there will be problems in concurrent usage? –  Martin Feb 11 '13 at 12:48
20  
If you are willing to use JodaTime you can do this in one line: DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendar(new DateTime().toGregorianCalendar()) –  Nicolas Mommaerts Mar 15 '13 at 14:19
    
XMLGregorianCalendar date2 = DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendar(new GregorianCalendar(YYYY, MM, DD)); –  shanyangqu Feb 19 at 11:10
    
Please be aware of that Calendar isn't threadsafe and therefore also GregorianCalender isn't. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/12131324/… –  questionare Jun 3 at 11:38

If you are using JAXB, then it's possible to replace the dateTime binding entirely and use something else than XMLGregorianCalendar.

In that way you can have JAXB do the repetitive stuff while you can spend the time on writing awesome code that delivers value.

I would suggest a Jodatime data type. Mapping directly to a plain java.util.Date may or may not make sense, depending on the context.

Example for a jodatime DateTime:

<jxb:globalBindings>
    <jxb:javaType name="org.joda.time.LocalDateTime" xmlType="xs:dateTime"
        parseMethod="test.util.JaxbConverter.parseDateTime"
        printMethod="se.seb.bis.test.util.JaxbConverter.printDateTime" />
    <jxb:javaType name="org.joda.time.LocalDate" xmlType="xs:date"
        parseMethod="test.util.JaxbConverter.parseDate"
        printMethod="test.util.JaxbConverter.printDate" />
    <jxb:javaType name="org.joda.time.LocalTime" xmlType="xs:time"
        parseMethod="test.util.JaxbConverter.parseTime"
        printMethod="test.util.JaxbConverter.printTime" />
    <jxb:serializable uid="2" />
</jxb:globalBindings>

And the converter:

public class JaxbConverter {
static final DateTimeFormatter dtf = ISODateTimeFormat.dateTimeNoMillis();
static final DateTimeFormatter df = ISODateTimeFormat.date();
static final DateTimeFormatter tf = ISODateTimeFormat.time();

public static LocalDateTime parseDateTime(String s) {
    try {
        if (StringUtils.trimToEmpty(s).isEmpty())
            return null;
        LocalDateTime r = dtf.parseLocalDateTime(s);
        return r;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

public static String printDateTime(LocalDateTime d) {
    try {
        if (d == null)
            return null;
        return dtf.print(d);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

public static LocalDate parseDate(String s) {
    try {
        if (StringUtils.trimToEmpty(s).isEmpty())
            return null;
        return df.parseLocalDate(s);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

public static String printDate(LocalDate d) {
    try {
        if (d == null)
            return null;
        return df.print(d);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

public static String printTime(LocalTime d) {
    try {
        if (d == null)
            return null;
        return tf.print(d);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

public static LocalTime parseTime(String s) {
    try {
        if (StringUtils.trimToEmpty(s).isEmpty())
            return null;
        return df.parseLocalTime(s);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
    }
}

See here: how replace XmlGregorianCalendar by Date?

If you are happy to just map to an instant based on the timezone+timestamp, and the original timezone is not really relevant, then java.util.Date is probably fine too.

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For those that might end up here looking for the opposite conversion (from XMLGregorianCalendar to Date):

XMLGregorianCalendar xcal = <assume this is initialized>;
java.util.Date dt = xcal.toGregorianCalendar().getTime();
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5  
Many thanks! That's what I was looking for! –  skiphoppy Feb 18 '11 at 19:46
3  
thanks a lot! your alternative is as helpful as the question is! –  P.M Oct 12 '11 at 18:06
1  
+1 great you provided it ! –  Stephane Rolland May 16 '12 at 15:55
1  
whola.. this is what i want.. –  aditya Aug 8 '12 at 9:17
    
Many thanks from me, too! :) –  Withheld Oct 15 '13 at 19:30

Just thought I'd add my solution below, since the answers above did not meet my exact needs. My Xml schema required seperate Date and Time elements, not a singe DateTime field. The standard XMLGregorianCalendar constructor used above will generate a DateTime field

Note there a couple of gothca's, such as having to add one to the month (since java counts months from 0).

GregorianCalendar cal = new GregorianCalendar();
cal.setTime(yourDate);
XMLGregorianCalendar xmlDate = DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendarDate(cal.get(Calendar.YEAR), cal.get(Calendar.MONTH)+1, cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH), 0);
XMLGregorianCalendar xmlTime = DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendarTime(cal.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY), cal.get(Calendar.MINUTE), cal.get(Calendar.SECOND), 0);
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nice solution for xsd:date –  JIV Jul 20 '12 at 11:51

A one line example using Joda-Time library:

XMLGregorianCalendar xgc = DatatypeFactory.newInstance().newXMLGregorianCalendar(new DateTime().toGregorianCalendar());

Credit to Nicolas Mommaerts from his comment in the accepted answer.

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Thank you for the one-liner, very nice! –  vikingsteve May 12 '14 at 8:19

I hope my encoding here is right ;D To make it faster just use the ugly getInstance() call of GregorianCalendar instead of constructor call:


import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import javax.xml.datatype.DatatypeFactory;
import javax.xml.datatype.XMLGregorianCalendar;

public class DateTest {

   public static void main(final String[] args) throws Exception {
      // do not forget the type cast :/
      GregorianCalendar gcal = (GregorianCalendar) GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
      XMLGregorianCalendar xgcal = DatatypeFactory.newInstance()
            .newXMLGregorianCalendar(gcal);
      System.out.println(xgcal);
   }

}

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+1 for using .getInstance() –  GenericJon Dec 14 '11 at 17:37
8  
-1 for using .getInstance(). GregorianCalendar.getInstance() is the equivalent of Calendar.getInstance(). The Calendar.getInstance() cannot make it faster, because it uses the same new GregorianCalendar(), but before it also checks the default locale and could create Japanese or Buddish calendar instead, so for some lucky users it will be ClassCastException! –  kan Apr 19 '12 at 9:39

Here is a method for converting from a GregorianCalendar to XMLGregorianCalendar; I'll leave the part of converting from a java.util.Date to GregorianCalendar as an exercise for you:

import java.util.GregorianCalendar;

import javax.xml.datatype.DatatypeFactory;
import javax.xml.datatype.XMLGregorianCalendar;

public class DateTest {

   public static void main(final String[] args) throws Exception {
      GregorianCalendar gcal = new GregorianCalendar();
      XMLGregorianCalendar xgcal = DatatypeFactory.newInstance()
            .newXMLGregorianCalendar(gcal);
      System.out.println(xgcal);
   }

}

EDIT: Slooow :-)

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8  
+1 for including imports! –  pr1001 Apr 19 '13 at 10:09
    
This a solution to convert GregorianCalendar to XMLGregorianCalendar and not what is indicated in the question –  ftrujillo Jan 21 at 15:25

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