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C++ Restrict Template Function
Is it possible to write a C++ template to check for a function's existence?

Is it possible to restrict the types for which a template may be instantiated (that is, have a compiler error if I use template<type_not_allowed>)?

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marked as duplicate by sehe, Vlad Lazarenko, Praetorian, Prasoon Saurav, C. A. McCann Dec 2 '11 at 17:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way would be to provide no default implementation, and specialize your class template only on those types you wish to allow. For example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<class X> class Gizmo
{
public:
    Gizmo();
};

template<> Gizmo<int>::Gizmo()
{
}

int main()
{
    Gizmo<float> gf; // ERROR:  No specialization for Gizmo<float> results in a linking error
}
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You can check here C++ Restrict Template Function

I can't leave comment so it's an answer ...

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1  
Good answer, to make things clear, an example: struct No {}; struct Yes : public No {}; template<typename T> struct myfunction_allower { enum {value=true}; }; template<> struct myfunction_allower<No> { enum {value=false}; }; template <typename T> void myfunction(T ) { static_assert( myfunction_allower<T>::value , " type not allowed " ) ; } void test() { myfunction(1.); struct No no; myfunction(no); // fails with error C2338: type not allowed struct Yes yes; myfunction(yes); // it works : forbidding is not transitive } –  reder Dec 2 '11 at 16:38

Make the constructor private in the illegal type:

template<typename T>
class Z
{
public:
    Z() {}
};

template<>
class Z<int>
{
private:
    Z();
};

Z<float> f; // OK
Z<int>   i; // Compile time error.
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I wonder if leaving the specialization incomplete wouldn't be simpler and still do the trick? –  UncleBens Dec 2 '11 at 16:41
    
@UncleBens, that would produce a linker error (I think this is what you mean: template<> class Z<int> { public: Z(); };. As I have it above it produces a compiler error, earlier detection. –  hmjd Dec 2 '11 at 16:52
1  
No, I mean template <> class Z<int>; You shouldn't be able to instantiate an incomplete type at compile time. (Basically the same - but reversed - as the accepted answer, if the base template was left incomplete.) –  UncleBens Dec 2 '11 at 20:36
    
@UncleBens, yes that is an improvement on mine. Less effort to code and compile time error. Cheers. –  hmjd Dec 2 '11 at 20:43

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