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I have this kind of class and i would like to take variable outside(return i guess) so that i would be able to do stuff with it.

    class MyClass{

        private function MyPrivate(){
            $rows = 'SomeVar';
            echo $rows.' is echoed from inside';
            //return $rows;
            return $this->rows;
        }

        function Foo(){
            $this->MyPrivate();
            //$this->rows;
        }
    //return $rows;
    //return $this->rows;
    }

    $myclass = new MyClass;
    $myclass->Foo();

    //$myclass->rows;

    echo '<br />';

    echo $rows.'is echoed from outside';

Echoing variable inside the private function inside the class works, but echoing variable outside does not. Commented out code is what I tried to use to achieve wanted result. I did not make this class so I do not want to mess with it and change anything in it, because I fear it may mess things up.

this is my out put:

SomeVar is echoed from inside
is echoed from outside

As you can see in the second instance there is no SomeVar(variable) present. I am surprised it's working though. I am reading up on documentation and tutorials on the web for the past two days but this needs to be solved soon, that is why I posted. Please help. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
So, why not just return the value you want to use? –  TaylorOtwell Dec 2 '11 at 16:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you use the return statement, you should assign it to a variable. Also, you should have returned $rows, not $this->rows, since they're actually different variables:

class MyClass{

    private function MyPrivate(){
        $rows = 'SomeVar';
        echo $rows.' is echoed from inside';
        return $rows;
    }

    function Foo(){
        return $this->MyPrivate();
    }
}

$myclass = new MyClass;
$rows = $myclass->Foo();

echo '<br />';

echo $rows.'is echoed from outside';
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thank you! Works! –  user000001 Dec 2 '11 at 16:41

You really should explicitly declare your variables in your class. Also, there's no reason to worry about returning rows from the different functions - just make it a member of your class, set it's visibility to public and access it inside and outside your class.

It looked like you were also confused between local variables in a function and class member variables. You must always use $this-> to access a member of the class.

<?php
class MyClass
{
    public $rows;

    private function MyPrivate()
    {
        $this->rows = "Low-level programming is good for the programmer's soul --J. Carmack";
        echo $this->rows . ' is echoed from inside';
    }

    function Foo()
    {
        $this->MyPrivate();
    }
}

$obj = new MyClass;
$obj->Foo();

echo $obj->rows . ' is echoed from outside.';
share|improve this answer

you could do:

class MyClass{

    private function MyPrivate(){
        $rows = 'SomeVar';
        echo $rows.' is echoed from inside';
        //return $rows;
        return $rows;
    }

    function Foo(){
        return $this->MyPrivate();
        //$this->rows;
    }
//return $rows;
//return $this->rows;
}

$myclass = new MyClass;
$rows = $myclass->Foo();

//$myclass->rows;

echo '<br />';

echo $rows.'is echoed from outside';

codepad here: http://codepad.org/8rr1hfI3

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Cool, thanks for introducing me to codepad. I did not know something like this existed for php. –  user000001 Dec 2 '11 at 16:44

Try setting $rows as a member var:

class MyClass
{
    public $rows;

    private function myPrivate()
    {
        $this->rows = 1;
    }

    function Foo(){
        $this->MyPrivate();
    }
}

$myclass = new MyClass();

$myclass->foo();

$rows = $myclass->rows;
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