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How do I call this function in a view (.ctp file)

The actual function is defined in the UserController class

 function verbose_log($msg) {
    date_default_timezone_set('Asia/Calcutta');
    $today = date("Ymd");
    $timestamp = time();
    $filename = "errorlog";
    if (!file_exists($filename)) { 
        echo "The file $filename exists";
        $ourFileHandle = touch($filename) or die("can't open file");    
    } 
    $fd = fopen($filename, "a");
    $str = "${today}|${timestamp}|${msg}";
    fwrite($fd, $str . PHP_EOL);
    $timestamp ='';
    fclose($fd); 
}
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4  
You don't call the function in the view, you call it in the controller and pass the results to the view. Could you give an example of what you're trying to do? –  Juhana Dec 2 '11 at 16:34
    
If you want to call a function from the view, it needs to be in bootstrap.php. But you'll lose any kind of object functionality. –  Benjam Dec 2 '11 at 16:35
    
in controller i written log function, am doing payment process, when the payment process is success am redirecting page to .com/paymentresp, i have called paymentresp, in this i want to call the log function –  bharanikumar Bs Dec 2 '11 at 16:37
    
You should elaborate on the question or post some code. I'm willing to bet you want to do this because you think it is the only way to accomplish something that shouldn't be accomplished by calling a controller function from a view. you will most likely end up in a redirect loop when trying to do that. –  Tim Joyce Dec 2 '11 at 16:37
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3 Answers

As stated by others, you should call another controller method from your controller action:

class UsersController extends AppController {

    public function paymentresp() {
        // do stuff
        $this->_verbose_log($logMessage);
        // do more stuff
    }

    protected function _verbose_log($message) {
        // log stuff
    }
}

(By prefixing the method name with an underscore [the convention for protected methods], people won't be able to run this as a controller action by visiting http://example.com/controller/verbose_log)

Also, all CakePHP objects inherit a log method which calls CakeLog internally. You could use this existing functionality instead of implementing it yourself:

class UsersController extends AppController {

    public function paymentresp() {
        // do stuff
        $this->log($logMessage, 'error');
        // or
        CakeLog::write('error', $logMessage);
        // do more stuff
    }
}
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Move your function to bootstrap.php, and you can run it from anywhere.

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1  
This is technically correct, but most of the time bootstrap.php is the worst place to put functions as it breaks the MVC pattern. –  Juhana Dec 3 '11 at 7:26
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Using requestAction you can call a controller method in to your view page.

e.g.

$this->requestAction('/ControllerName/MethodName/');
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1  
but not in this case. its just utterly wrong to do anything like this in the above use case. nothing helps against bad design. the method should be in a lib class - or some static method class etc. PS: also, if you need to use requestAction in 99% of all cases it is also bad design. –  mark Jun 6 '13 at 13:01
    
Yes, I agree with you. It is a bad design but this is the only handy technique to do so and top of that it provided the the Cakephp. –  Amar Banerjee Jun 6 '13 at 13:06
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