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It looks like passing a list's enumerator to a function "byval" is quite different than passing it "byref". Essentially, regular "byval" passing will NOT change the caller's "enumerator.Current value", even if the function advances the enumerator. I was wondering if anyone knows why this is the case? Is an enumerator a primitive like an integer, without an object reference, and hence changes to it don't get reflected in the caller?

Here is the sample code:

This function is byval, and gets stuck in an infinite loop, spitting out "1" message boxes, because the enumerator's "current" never advances past 5:

Public Sub listItemsUsingByValFunction()
    Dim list As New List(Of Integer)(New Integer() {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10})

    Dim enumerator = list.GetEnumerator()
    enumerator.MoveNext()
    While enumerator.Current <= 5
        listFirstItemByVal(enumerator)
    End While
End Sub
Private Sub listFirstItemByVal(ByVal enumerator As List(Of Integer).Enumerator)
    MsgBox(enumerator.Current)
    enumerator.MoveNext()
End Sub

This, on the other hand, works just as one would expect:

Public Sub listItemsUsingByRefFunction()
    Dim list As New List(Of Integer)(New Integer() {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10})

    Dim enumerator = list.GetEnumerator()
    enumerator.MoveNext()
    While enumerator.Current <= 5
        listFirstItemByRef(enumerator)
    End While
End Sub
Private Sub listFirstItemByRef(ByRef enumerator As List(Of Integer).Enumerator)
    MsgBox(enumerator.Current)
    enumerator.MoveNext()
End Sub

The difference between the two functions is only whether the listFirstItem__ function accepts a byval or a byref enumerator.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The reason why you're seeing this behavior is that List(Of T).Enumerator is a Struct and not a Class as is commonly expected. So when you pass the enumerator you pass a copy of it and hence only that copy gets updated when you call MoveNext

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Interesting! Thank you for clarifying this! –  Michael Zlatkovsky Dec 2 '11 at 18:02
    
So if you pass enumerators to functions, do you always just make a mental note to use a "byref"? E.g., is there some workaround to avoid having to always remember this, especially since Visual Studio will auto-generate methods that always use byval, and so such thing might easily go unnoticed? –  Michael Zlatkovsky Dec 2 '11 at 18:05
    
@MichaelZlatkovsky there is no need to do this if you use IEnumerator(Of T) which is the most common case. Whenever I pass a type specific enumerator I always check the type before doing ByVal vs. ByRef –  JaredPar Dec 2 '11 at 18:09

Using the sample code as supplied would not compile using Option Strict On. Fixing that may fix the difference you see.

Public Sub listItemsUsingByValFunction()
    Dim list As New List(Of Integer)(New Integer() {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10})

    Dim enumerator As IEnumerator(Of Integer) = list.GetEnumerator()
    enumerator.MoveNext()
    Debug.WriteLine("S " & enumerator.Current)
    Stop
    Do
        Debug.WriteLine("W " & enumerator.Current)
        If Not listFirstItemByVal(enumerator) Then Exit Do
    Loop
End Sub

Private Function listFirstItemByVal(ByVal enumerator As IEnumerator(Of Integer)) As Boolean
    Debug.WriteLine("F " & enumerator.Current)
    Return enumerator.MoveNext()
End Function

Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
    listItemsUsingByValFunction()
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Really? I added "Option Strict On" to my original code, but I still get no warnings or errors. –  Michael Zlatkovsky Dec 4 '11 at 3:13
1  
I should have said, Option Strict On, Option Infer Off, Option Explicit On. Sorry. –  dbasnett Dec 4 '11 at 13:05
    
Huh, I didn't realize that turning Inferring off would catch errors not shown otherwise (when I'd first set up my project, I sort of assumed that the more things are "On", the better!) Is having Infer off a best practice, in your opinion? Doesn't it require quite a bit more typing -- e.g., is it worth it for you? –  Michael Zlatkovsky Dec 9 '11 at 15:42
    
I like Option Strict On, Option Infer Off, Option Explicit On. It is more typing, but it helps catch errors like this one. The first time you spend hours looking for an error that is caused by something not being what you think it is will convince you. –  dbasnett Dec 9 '11 at 15:48
    
Fair enough. What about C#, by the way? Do you know if it have a similar "Option Infer" switch? I've seen more and more code that certainly seems to use inference, but I wasn't sure if the C# compiler somehow has a better "sense" of what is or isn't safe to infer... –  Michael Zlatkovsky Dec 9 '11 at 20:37

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