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Running this code:

require 'benchmark'

Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("1+1") {15_000_000.times {1+1}}
  x.report("1+1") {15_000_000.times {1+1}}
  x.report("1+1") {15_000_000.times {1+1}}
  x.report("1+1") {15_000_000.times {1+1}}
  x.report("1+1") {15_000_000.times {1+1}}
end

Outputs these results:

       user     system      total        real
1+1  2.188000   0.000000   2.188000 (  2.250000)
1+1  2.250000   0.000000   2.250000 (  2.265625)
1+1  2.234000   0.000000   2.234000 (  2.250000)
1+1  2.203000   0.000000   2.203000 (  2.250000)
1+1  2.266000   0.000000   2.266000 (  2.281250)

Guessing the variation is a result of the system environment, but wanted to confirm this is the case.

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1  
"Guessing the variation is a result of the system environment", you are right. –  Guilherme Bernal Dec 2 '11 at 17:33
    
@LBg: Thanks, feel free to post that as an answer. –  blunders Dec 2 '11 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"Guessing the variation is a result of the system environment", you are right.

Benchmarks can't be precise all time. You don't have a perfect regular machine to run something always in the same time. Take two numbers from benchmark as the same if they were too near, as in this case.

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I tried using eval to partially unroll the loop, and although it made it faster, it made the execution time less consistent!

$VERBOSE &&= false # You do not want 15 thousand "warning: useless use of + in void context" warnings
# large_number = 15_000_000 # Too large! Caused eval to take too long, so I gave up
somewhat_large_number = 15_000
unrolled = "def do_addition\n" + ("1+1\n" * somewhat_large_number) + "end\n" ; nil
eval(unrolled)

require 'benchmark'

Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
  x.report("1+1 partially unrolled") { i = 0; while i < 1000; do_addition; i += 1; end}
end

gave me

      user     system      total        real
1+1 partially unrolled  0.750000   0.000000   0.750000 (  0.765586)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.765000   0.000000   0.765000 (  0.765586)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.688000   0.000000   0.688000 (  0.703089)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.797000   0.000000   0.797000 (  0.796834)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.750000   0.000000   0.750000 (  0.749962)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.781000   0.000000   0.781000 (  0.781210)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.719000   0.000000   0.719000 (  0.718713)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.750000   0.000000   0.750000 (  0.749962)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.765000   0.000000   0.765000 (  0.765585)
1+1 partially unrolled  0.781000   0.000000   0.781000 (  0.781210)

For the purpose of comparison, your benchmark on my computer gave

      user     system      total        real
1+1  2.406000   0.000000   2.406000 (  2.406497)
1+1  2.407000   0.000000   2.407000 (  2.484629)
1+1  2.500000   0.000000   2.500000 (  2.734655)
1+1  2.515000   0.000000   2.515000 (  2.765908)
1+1  2.703000   0.000000   2.703000 (  4.391075)

(real time varied in the last line, but not user or total)

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@Grimm: I'm confused, the change you made appears slower than the code posted. Meaning your code was so slow it couldn't process adding "1+1" 15 million times. There's a huge differ between the stablity and runtime of the code I posted, and the code you posted. Only thing your proves to me really is how more unstable benchmarking can be. Am I missing something? Guess the main thing I don't get is how your answer relates to my question. Realize you took the time to think over the problem, I just feel like I'm missing your point. Thanks! –  blunders Dec 5 '11 at 0:54
    
@blunders: I could not make do_addition consist of 15 million additions, so instead I made it consist of 15 thousand additions and called it a thousand times. 15_000 * 1000 == 15_000_000. –  Andrew Grimm Dec 5 '11 at 2:28
    
@Grimm: What is the question your answer is addressing? The question I posted was basically would someone please confirm that benchmark results are only as stable as the environment they're run in. The code was only provided as a proof of concept that was easy to read, and see that the results were unstable. –  blunders Dec 5 '11 at 11:36

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