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I don't understand what is wrong with this code. Sometimes two threads start executing the try block. I am creating a new instance of popo every time I call the function. Can please anybody figure out what the problem is?

public class Instance {
  private static AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger(0);

  public synchronized void incrementInstance() {
    i.getAndIncrement();
  }

  public synchronized void decrementInstance() {
    i.getAndDecrement();
  }

  public synchronized int getInstances() {
    return i.get();
  }
}

public class popo {
  private static volatile MyMutex instanceMutex = new MyMutex();

  public void doSomething() {
    synchronized (instanceMutex) {
      final Instance no = new Instance();
      if (no.getInstances() > 0) {
         instanceMutex.wait();
      } else {
         no.incrementInstance();
      }
    }

    try {
     // do something
    } finally {
        synchronized (instanceMutex) {
          final Instance no = new Instance();
          if (no.Instances() > 0) {
            no.decrementInstance();
          }
          instanceMutex.notify();
        }
     }
  }
  private static class MyMutex {}
}
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the code smells all over the place :-) Actually, doing things like creating new instances that do nothing more than access a static field make things confusing (see previous responses). So, this is what I suggest:

  1. You should avoid using wait/notify if you are writing new code. Take a look to the concurrent package and to the Item69 in the Effective Java book.
  2. Based on what I understand from your code, you need a Semaphore like:
static final Semaphore SEMAPHORE = new Semaphore(1);
...

SEMAPHORE.take(); // blocks, only one thread is allowed to proceed

try{
   //critical section
} finally {
    SEMAPHORE.release(); // never blocks, always within a finally block
}

Then you can use the method getQueueLength() to know how many threads are waiting and replace the AtomicInteger you are using. See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/Semaphore.html

  1. Consider using an executor. Then, once you submit the task, you can wait for the Future.
  2. If you still want to use wait/notify, make sure to put all the code within the synchronized block and to use the standard idiom (Item69 from Effective Java):
synchronized(instanceMutex) {
    while(< condition does not hold >) {
        obj.wait();
    }

    // Perform required actions
}
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The try block is not inside of a synchronized block. The OS can pause a thread and resume another one at any point, if one thread has just left the synchronized block and gets paused another could logically execute the try block before or at the same time as the first thread to finish the synchronized block.

If you require only one thread at a time to execute the try block, try the following:

synchronized (instanceMutex) {
  final Instance no = new Instance();
  if (no.getInstances() > 0) {
    instanceMutex.wait();
  } else {
    no.incrementInstance();
  }
  try {
   // do something
  } finally {
    if (no.Instances() > 0) {
      no.decementInstance();
    }
    instanceMutex.notify();
  }
}
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The synchronization he was attempting is actually taken care of with Instance no - if it's greater than zero, another thread is in the critical section, and the other thread is supposed to wait. The problem was, he was creating a new instance of his locking variable in each thread (the second line in your example). This subtlety was lost on me as well, at first. –  Hannele Dec 2 '11 at 19:51
    
@Hannele the problem is as I have stated it. The Instance methods delegate to a static field. Having multiple instances of Instance was not the problem. –  rich.okelly Dec 2 '11 at 21:59
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The problem is you're creating a new instance of no each time you call doSomething().

synchronized (instanceMutex) {
  // each thread will make its own instance here
  final Instance no = new Instance();

Instead, you'll need to declare Instance no globally and statically, just like MyMutex.

final, incidentally, only means that the reference of no cannot be changed (i.e., you couldn't write no = new Instance() at some other point in your program).

static is the keyword you're looking for - it means that each thread will reference only a single instance of Instance no.

If that doesn't help, should you have more than one thread waiting at the same time, you may be releasing your threads all at once. To prevent that, you'll want to loop back and check no.getInstances() after you've waited, like so:

synchronized (instanceMutex) {
    final Instance no = new Instance();
    while (no.getInstances() > 0) { // this check will need to be synchronized as well
        instanceMutex.wait();
    }
    // and only increment `no` once you've made a successful check.
    no.incrementInstance();
}

Moral: race conditions are tricky!

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then whats the use of instanceMutex.wait(); then..??????????????? –  Saurabh Kumar Dec 2 '11 at 17:43
    
Generally one question mark is sufficient, but I think you're right. I'll take a closer look. –  Hannele Dec 2 '11 at 19:35
    
There we go, I think I've found the actual problem - except for that, I think you've implemented the exclusion correctly. –  Hannele Dec 2 '11 at 19:47
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