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I'm trying to create/enable a mailbox on an exchange 2010 server from C# code. Everywhere I look I see people using the code shown below.

However I get the following error:

The term 'Enable-Mailbox' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.

What am I doing wrong?

        SecureString password = new SecureString();

        string str_password = "myPassword";
        string username = "myUsername";

        //FQDN is ofcourse the (fully qualified) name of our exchange server..
        string liveIdconnectionUri = "http://FQDN/Powershell?serializationLevel=Full";

        foreach (char x in str_password)
        {
            password.AppendChar(x);
        }

        PSCredential credential = new PSCredential(username, password);

        WSManConnectionInfo connectionInfo = new WSManConnectionInfo((new Uri(liveIdconnectionUri)), "http://schemas.microsoft.com/powershell/Microsoft.Exchange", credential);
        connectionInfo.AuthenticationMechanism = AuthenticationMechanism.Default;

        Runspace runspace = System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.RunspaceFactory.CreateRunspace(connectionInfo);
        PowerShell powershell = PowerShell.Create();
        PSCommand command = new PSCommand();

        command.AddCommand("Enable-Mailbox");
        command.AddParameter("Identity", "domainname.ltd/OUName/TestAcc Jap");
        command.AddParameter("Alias", "TestAccJap");
        command.AddParameter("Database", "DB-Name");

        powershell.Commands = command;

        try
        {
            runspace.Open();
            powershell.Runspace = runspace;
            powershell.Invoke();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            runspace.Dispose();
            runspace = null;
            powershell.Dispose();
            powershell = null;
        }
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How do I programatically create an exchange 2010 mailbox using C#. Please read the first paragraph of the accepted answer - does that help? – Ken White Dec 2 '11 at 19:31
    
    
when i try the code of the accepted answer i get the following error: No snap-ins have been registered for Windows PowerShell version 2. – jagsler Dec 2 '11 at 19:37
    
There's your answer. :) The Exchange snap-in hasn't been registered for PowerShell, and therefore it doesn't recognize Enable-Mailbox. So your new question (better on serverfault is "How do I register the Exchange 2010 snap-in for PowerShell 2?". – Ken White Dec 2 '11 at 19:44
    
But it only says it hasn't been registred when i call the function from C#, when I try to enable a mailbox from PS I can open a session to the exch. server and then succesfully call the enable-mailbox command. When I try this: pedroliska.wordpress.com/2011/07/22/… it shows all the commands without errors, but when I replace 'get-command' with 'Enable-Mailbox' with the additional parameters it gives no errors but it also doesn't work. I figure this is because with the code from link I am not connected to the exchange server(?) – jagsler Dec 7 '11 at 14:15

This is probably a powershell related error. If you are running the code from a remote machine (not the exchange server), you have to enable remote powershell access for the user in question and make sure the firewall(s) allows connections to the exchange server on port 80. On the exchange server:

Set-User –identity username –RemotePowershellEnabled $True

The user also has to be a member of an exchange management role allowing mailbox creation.

If you are using a load balanser and/or have a DAG you may have to set up an Alternate Service Account to enable Kerberos authentication. See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff808313.aspx for details. I had to enable this to make the code run in my environment. I modified the code a bit to just test if I was able to run exchange powershell commands. The following code responds with the full name of the USERIDENT user if successful.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    SecureString password = new SecureString();
    string str_password = "PASS";
    string username = "domain\\user";

    //FQDN is ofcourse the (fully qualified) name of our exchange server.. 
    string liveIdconnectionUri = "http://SERVERFQDN/Powershell?serializationLevel=Full";
    foreach (char x in str_password)
    {
        password.AppendChar(x);
    }
    PSCredential credential = new PSCredential(username, password);
    WSManConnectionInfo connectionInfo = new WSManConnectionInfo((new Uri(liveIdconnectionUri)), "http://schemas.microsoft.com/powershell/Microsoft.Exchange", credential);
    Runspace runspace = null;
    PowerShell powershell = PowerShell.Create();
    PSCommand command = new PSCommand();
    command.AddCommand("Get-Mailbox");
    command.AddParameter("Identity", "USERIDENT");
    powershell.Commands = command;
    try
    {
        connectionInfo.AuthenticationMechanism = AuthenticationMechanism.Default;
        runspace = System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.RunspaceFactory.CreateRunspace(connectionInfo);
        runspace.Open();
        powershell.Runspace = runspace;
        Collection<PSObject> commandResults = powershell.Invoke<PSObject>();
        foreach (PSObject result in commandResults)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(result.ToString());
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    }
    finally
    {
        runspace.Dispose();
        runspace = null;
        powershell.Dispose();
        powershell = null;
    } 

}
share|improve this answer
    
I already tested it with normal PowerShell code and then everything works. I ran Set-User –identity username –RemotePowershellEnabled $True you mentioned above just to be sure, but again the code I showed in my question does nothing but displaying an error with: The term 'Enable-Mailbox' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, functi.... and this is because the snap in isn't loaded I guess?? – jagsler Dec 7 '11 at 16:14
    
Try using connectionInfo.AuthenticationMechanism = AuthenticationMechanism.Basic; instead of default. – BlackCat Dec 7 '11 at 20:47
    
I changed and got some new errors, I fixed most of them but am currently stuck at the following error. Next part in the next comment. Connecting to remote server failed with the following error message : The WinRM client cannot process the request. The authentication mechanism requested by the client is not supported by the server or unencrypted traffic is disabled in the service configuration. Verify the unencrypted traffic setting in the service configuration or specify one of the authentication mechanisms supported by the server. – jagsler Dec 8 '11 at 10:37
    
To use Kerberos, specify the computer name as the remote destination. Also verify that the client computer and the destination computer are joined to a domain. To use Basic, specify the computer name as the remote destination, specify Basic authentication and provide user name and password. Possible authentication mechanisms reported by server: For more information, see the about_Remote_Troubleshooting Help topic. – jagsler Dec 8 '11 at 10:38
    
I have modified my answer above. Based on your comments above I think you might have kerberos authentication issues. – BlackCat Dec 8 '11 at 14:49

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