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I have a generated table that has too many <td> elements. I call

$('#Container td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();

to remove all of the unwanted <td> elements that does not have the class name SlideInfo on it. Problem is that I have a inner table (child) that gets removed as well. How can I tell jQuery to only remove the siblings of the <td>s not the inner one as well.

Starts off

<table>
<tr>
<td class="SlideInfo">
    <table>
        <td class="SlideInfo">
            This gets removed, I know the html is wrong on this but this is an example.
        </td>
    </table>
</td>

<td class="SlideInfo">
    <table>
        <td class="SlideInfo">
            This gets removed, I know the html is wrong on this but this is an example.
        </td>
    </table>
</td>
</tr>
</table>

I call $('#Container td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove(); and it removes those unwanted td's but it also removes the children td's of the ones I do want.

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How would you differentiate between the ones you want removed and the ones you don't want removed? –  Pastor Bones Dec 2 '11 at 19:40
1  
I would not rely on jQuery to fix bad HTML. Why not fix the root problem instead? –  Sparky Dec 2 '11 at 19:42
    
@pb they have a class on the ones I want. –  user516883 Dec 2 '11 at 19:44
    
@sparky. I have tried for hours but no luck. I have no clue why. –  user516883 Dec 2 '11 at 19:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the child selector '>' which will only look for the matching elements among the immediate children of the container. Try this

$('#Container > td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();
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Even though i should look at the root cause this will work for now. Thanks! –  user516883 Dec 2 '11 at 19:57

I believe the correct selector is this

$('#Container>td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();

It selects only child elements of #Container. However, if #Container is in fact a table element and not a tr, you may need something like this:

$('#Container>tr>td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();

or this

$('#Container>tbody>tr>td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();
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I voted Joseph's answer up. It takes into account both to "tr" tag and possible "tbody" tags –  jmbertucci Dec 2 '11 at 19:54

Try using the "child selector".

$('#Container > tr > td[class!="SlideInfo"]').remove();

Notice the greater than sign in the selector. Also note, that you should use the "tr" tag before the greater-than sign.

Otherwise, the selector is claiming that there should be a "td" tag as a direct child of a whatever is marked as "#Container". If "#container" is the id on the "table" tag, I'm not sure if the selector will work correct.

The ">" says to "select only the children of parent". Thus, grandchildren should not be selected. This assumes that your table has an id of "Container".

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