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How can I set generic type? For example:

Class<List<Integer>> asd = List<Integer>.class \\ does not work

May be that is a bit stupid question, but I have never met a code where this thing was done.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In short, what you want is List.class; the generic types are only available at compile-time, and are "erased" at run-time. There's a brief explanation here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html ...and a bit more detail here: http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860

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Compiler has all information to check if type is correctly assigned or not. Why does it make me to use ugly suppress warnings annotations when I could (if it is supported by language of course) specify concrete type and not use raw generic Class. And then, ok, let type information be erased in runtime. But in source code why can not I have it specified? –  michael nesterenko Dec 2 '11 at 20:31
    
In brief, the runtime type can't be checked, because the Class object (and the runtime environment that it reflects) doesn't have a slot for the generic type being filled-in, since in most (not all) cases, that can't be determined by the compiler for a Class-object… i.e. List<Object>.class would be .equal to List<String>.class, they both yield Class<List> = List.class … So even though in your example, asd would be of type Class<List<Integer>>, you could likewise use asd to hold Class<String> or something else. In the limited case where asd is final, you don't need asd –  BRPocock Dec 2 '11 at 21:19
    
You speak about runtime it is not important here. What important is to specify concrete type for generic class in source code. That is the main point of my question. You see, I need no runtime capabilities here. –  michael nesterenko Dec 3 '11 at 1:06
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Well, put another way: the reason that there are no specifications for generic types in the Class type or .class notation, is because it would not matter to the code it creates. Or, seen differently: Class<List> expresses the methods and properties of any List, regardless of the specific type that it might be containing; and, as the signatures of those methods compile into types that take Object, you could (but should not) ignore the generic type specifications and e.g. push a String into a List<Integer> (and wreak havoc) –  BRPocock Dec 3 '11 at 3:58
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This is not possible, due to type erasure. There's a number of hacks in various libraries to help out with reflection, but the language itself has generally poor support for introspection of generic types.

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Compiler has all information to check if type is correctly assigned or not. Why does it make me to use ugly suppress warnings annotations when I could (if it is supported by language of course) specify concrete type and not use raw generic Class. And then, ok, let type information be erased in runtime. But in source code why can not I have it specified? –  michael nesterenko Dec 2 '11 at 20:16
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