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I'm trying to do a calculation on a circle with angles and a triangle inside.

What I'm trying to find is if it is possible to group logical operators, or if it is not advisable.

EX: If the angle is in quadrant 1 of the circle (>315 deg but 45 deg or less), or in quadrant 3 (> 135 deg but less then <= 225 deg).

My basic code works out to:

if (angle > 315 && angle <= 45)
{
    //do codeA
}
else if (angle > 135 && angle <= 225)
{
    //do codeA
}

etc.

What I want to do is:

if ((angle > 315 && angle <= 45) || (angle > 135 && angle <= 225)
{
    //do codeA
}
else if ((angle > 45 && <= 135) || (angle > 225 && angle <= 315)
{
    //do codeB
}

I'm thinking instead of looking at a switch operator, since I have been drastically underusing those.

So basically, my two questions are:

  1. Regardless of if it is the best way, is it possible to group logical operators the way I want to (if ((A == 1 && B == 1) || (A == 2 && B == 4))?

  2. Would a switch statement be the proper way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Your doing it the correct way. –  Evan Larsen Dec 2 '11 at 21:03
    
((A == 1 && B == 1)||(A==2 && B==4)) you mean? –  Charles Dec 3 '11 at 2:47
    
Tested it out and made it work. Answer above is the correct one, which for some odd reason did not work for me a few months ago. I'll blame being newer to programming. –  Charles Dec 5 '11 at 18:45

1 Answer 1

Traditionally

  1. 1st Quadrant 0-90
  2. 2nd Quadrant 90-180
  3. 3rd Quadrant 180-270
  4. 4th Quadrant 270-360.

So if A is the angle , when you divide it by 180 you get a remainder 0-90 when you are in the first or the third quadrant.

So you can simple use the modulo operator to simplify your condition.

if (  (A % 180) < 90 )
{
  //first or third quad
}
else
{
  //second or fourth quad
}

Please customize it to your angle ranges and boundary conditions

You cannot use a switch statement here because you are using an inequality comparison

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answerless answer. . . "Can I do A?" "You can do B." "But can I do A?" –  Charles Dec 3 '11 at 2:46
    
If you ask Can I do A here and A can be simplified people will tell you so... –  parapura rajkumar Dec 3 '11 at 10:15
    
The problem is I'm not using the circle quadrant for a circle calculation, I'm finding which side of a triangle to calculate using coh, which requires those angles for me to know which length is adjacent. This is why I wanted A answered and not your B. –  Charles Dec 3 '11 at 16:36

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