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to find if a given string is palindrome or is not palindrome

I need to create a program that allows a user to input a string and my program will check to see if that string they entered is a palindrome (word that can be read the same backwards as it can forwards).

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marked as duplicate by Mike Christensen, zdan, JohnFx, casperOne Dec 3 '11 at 4:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
what have you tried? std::string, std::reverse and operator==? –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 21:01
    
I would first start by clicking on the little "search" bar in the upper right, typing in "palindrome" and browsing through the dozens of possible answers across various languages.. –  Mike Christensen Dec 2 '11 at 21:02
1  
@MikeChristensen That's a question tagged C, the kinds of things one would gripe about when debating answers would be different in C++... –  HostileFork Dec 2 '11 at 21:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just compare the string with itself reversed:

string input;

cout << "Please enter a string: ";
cin >> input;

if (input == string(input.rbegin(), input.rend())) {
    cout << input << " is a palindrome";
}

This constructor of string takes a beginning and ending iterator and creates the string from the characters between those two iterators. Since rbegin() is the end of the string and incrementing it goes backwards through the string, the string we create will have the characters of input added to it in reverse, reversing the string.

Then you just compare it to input and if they are equal, it is a palindrome.

This does not take into account capitalisation or spaces, so you'll have to improve on it yourself.

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thanks!! that worked :) –  Wil Prim Dec 2 '11 at 21:05
1  
I would vote your answer up, except the obvious gripe: it's homework, provide an approach/algorithm, not the code. What has the op learned from this exercise, laziness pays. :( –  Nim Dec 2 '11 at 21:53
    
@Nim oops, didn't see the homework tag... –  Seth Carnegie Dec 2 '11 at 22:07

Note that reversing the whole string (either with the rbegin()/rend() range constructor or with std::reverse) and comparing it with the input would perform unnecessary work.

It's sufficient to compare the first half of the string with the latter half, in reverse:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    std::string s;
    std::cin >> s;
    if( equal(s.begin(), s.begin() + s.size()/2, s.rbegin()) )
        std::cout << "is a palindrome.\n";
    else
        std::cout << "is NOT a palindrome.\n";
}

demo: http://ideone.com/mq8qK

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This is a good way to do it, +1 –  Seth Carnegie Dec 2 '11 at 21:09
    
+1 definitely better in terms of resource and time complexity –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 21:50
bool IsPalindrome(const char* psz)
{
    int i = 0;
    int j;

    if ((psz == NULL) || (psz[0] == '\0'))
    {
        return false;
    }

    j = strlen(psz) - 1;
    while (i < j)
    {
        if (psz[i] != psz[j])
        {
            return false;
        }
        i++;
        j--;
    }
    return true;

}

// STL string version:

bool IsPalindrome(const string& str)
{
    if (str.empty())
        return false;

    int i = 0;                // first characters
    int j = str.length() - 1; // last character

    while (i < j)
    {
        if (str[i] != str[j])
        {
            return false;
        }
        i++;
        j--;
    }
    return true;
}
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2  
sorry, the question is tagged C++ and there is no justification to produce obfuscated code like this in this case (ever?). See Cubbi's answer for immediate proof –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 21:52
1  
You really consider the code above as obfuscated? Cubbi's solution is just STL kung-fu. Nothing wrong with that. But the code above is the classic solution to the problem - just not using STL. To make you happy, I'll demonstrate a reasonable STL variation of the same solution. –  selbie Dec 2 '11 at 23:04
    
admittedly it could be a lot worse. If you do the C++ (not necessarily STL) variant, let me remove my -1 –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 23:08
    
I don't know what you mean by the "C++" variant that isn't STL. Almost all C code is valid C++ code. When someone speaks of a "string" in C/C++, I think "pointer to character". The "string class" is merely an encapsulation of a char pointer with extra overhead and some nifty features. I've spent more years than I'll admit striving to make all lines of code I write readable, understandable, and maintainable. So you can see why I would get spazzed about my code being called "obfuscated". –  selbie Dec 2 '11 at 23:20
    
have removed -1, I'd personally say that returning false for an empty string is a bug (one which would never have occurred when using std::equals, I might add). I'd also wager that common idiom would write the while loop as for(int i=) but - I guess that is down to habits –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 23:21

Reverse the string and check if original string and reverse are same or not

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I'm no c++ guy, but you should be able to get the gist from this.

public static string Reverse(string s) {
    if (s == null || s.Length < 2) {
        return s;
    }

    int length = s.Length;
    int loop = (length >> 1) + 1;
    int j;
    char[] chars = new char[length];
    for (int i = 0; i < loop; i++) {
        j = length - i - 1;
        chars[i] = s[j];
        chars[j] = s[i];
    }
    return new string(chars);
}
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6  
If you're not a C++ guy, why answer a C++ question using pidgin C++ that doesn't come close to compiling? :-/ If offering advice in a language you don't know, my suggestion would be to use "obvious" pseudocode which is nearly English. (For instance, Let L = Length of S is a lot less likely to cause eye-rolling than int length = s.Length) –  HostileFork Dec 2 '11 at 21:09
    
Anyone familiar with code should be able to figure that out. jeez. I guess Hostile is the correct modifier for you. –  varatis Dec 2 '11 at 21:21
4  
What... I only noticed this doesn't even check for palindromes after about... 30 seconds. So, it is obfuscated and not an answer? –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 21:54
    
@varatis I think my response was measured. I didn't downvote you. (Someone else did, and either did or didn't explain why.) I was making a suggestion on how you might provide feedback in a case like this without writing code that doesn't compile which is likely to confuse a new C++ programmer more than help them. And as for what a hostile fork is in software development, look it up... –  HostileFork Dec 2 '11 at 22:00

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