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I need VB6 code to connect a *.mdb file to one PC to another over the internet. When I update/save my database it must update via internet to other-side PC.

I wrote a VB6 simple database program that can save Roll_Num, Name, Address of student. It works on my PC, but how do I update/save/copy my *.mdb file to the other-side of the HOME PC by connecting it. How do I use my home PC to update it?

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Please share what you have done until now, so we'll be able to see how can we help you to improve it – Francisco Alvarado Dec 2 '11 at 21:22
    
It is very hard to understand what you are asking. Can you provide more details and try to clarify what exactly you want? – JohnFx Dec 2 '11 at 21:26
    
The "internet" just doesn't work that way. – LarsTech Dec 2 '11 at 21:29
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The problem is that this isn't a site where people write code for you. It is a place where you can ask a specific question and get an answer. So what is your question? Are you essentially asking how your VB6 code can access an MDB file over the internet to read and write to it? – JohnFx Dec 2 '11 at 22:14
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@MahanteshGidnavar Please stop spamming comments over and over. Other users here are volunteering their time and will get back to you when they can. If you have code that demonstrates your problem, edit it into your question. – Adam Lear Dec 2 '11 at 23:24

Dear sir: Your easiest way to remotely connect to a *.mdb file is to learn about Virtual Private Networks (VPN).

To make a VPN Server on a Windows XP computer: http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn_server.htm

You will need to become familiar with how network routers and firewalls work. You will need to learn about port forwarding and virtual server settings (example: http://web.belkin.com/support/kb/kb.asp?a=1448). It would be best if you could find someone who knows these things who lives nearby you for help.

Once your VPN server is up and working on the computer that has the *.mdb file, you will need to setup a VPN client on the "home PC": http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn.htm

You will need to make the folder that contains the *.mdb file into a share. Look for "Sharing Drives or Folders" at: http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_network.htm

Once your VPN server and VPN client are setup, the "home PC" (client) can connect to the *.mdb file on the "other-side PC" (server). The file path will be of the form \\server\share\file.mdb.

Good luck!

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Thank U Sir, U given me good Links @rskar – Mahantesh Gidnavar Dec 2 '11 at 22:44
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Jet databases have enough potential for corruption over a reasonably reliable hard-wired LAN. But accessing them over WiFi isn't recommended, let alone the Internet. A VPN does not solve this problem at all. – Bob77 Dec 3 '11 at 20:29
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@Bob R: I would agree that Jet has a bad reputation there; to anyone who wants to do a multi-user app over a network, I would recommend migrating to SQL Server Express. However, a VPN would still be desirable even then. – rskar Dec 5 '11 at 13:56
    
What hurt Jet in terms of corruption was these three factors: (1) FAT32; (2) Caching of file in the shared folder; (3) Multiuser simultaneous access. Jet is actually rather good in recovering from most corruption issues, BUT that assumes that its files are in sync across the network (caching works against this) and that the file system is reliable (which FAT32 wasn't with high capacity hard drives). Throw in multiuser access into the mix, and the *.mdb could become a hopeless mess over time. Turn off caching, use NTFS, no more than 2 or 3 users at a time, avoid most corruption issues. – rskar Dec 5 '11 at 13:58

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