Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a rule in prolog adjacent(X,Y,Zs), as true if X and Y are adjacent to each other in the list Zs.

I currently have:

append([],L,L).
append([H|T],L,[H|LT]):-append(T,L,LT).
sublist(S,L):-append(_,S,P),append(P,_,L).
adjacent(X,Y,Zs):-sublist([X,Y],Zs).

test:

1 ?- sublist([1,2],[1,2,3,4]).
true .

2 ?- sublist([1,3],[1,2,3,4,5]).
ERROR: Out of global stack
3 ?- 

Do you guys have any ideas? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
adjacent(X,Y, [X,Y|_]).
adjacent(X,Y, [Y,X|_]). % remove this if you want just Y after X
adjacent(X,Y, [_|T]) :- adjacent(X,Y,T).

that should work.

also, you have a predicate in the lists library called nextto(?X, ?Y, ?List) that will do the same (but keep in mind that the semantics of this predicate is that Y follows X in the list, not just plain adjacent in any order).

http://www.swi-prolog.org/pldoc/doc_for?object=section%282,%27A.12%27,swi%28%27/doc/Manual/lists.html%27%29%29

share|improve this answer
    
There is only one solution for nextto(X,Y,[1,2]) but your definition adjacent(X,Y,[1,2]) has two. –  false Dec 6 '11 at 3:27
    
@false the op asked for adjacency no matter the ordering, that's why my predicate gives two answers... nextto unifies Y being immediately after X, I thought that was so obvious that wasn't worth stating explicitly. –  fortran Dec 6 '11 at 8:44
    
Thank you for the clarification, @fortran. Evidently, it was not that obvious. –  false Dec 6 '11 at 10:44
    
@false I'll update the answer then, cheers. –  fortran Dec 6 '11 at 10:46

The behaviour of your program it's rather complex. The bug is in the sublist/2.

To trace I've renamed the predicates adding 1 to the names, but the definition it's taken verbatim from your code.

You can see that there are calls to append1 (labelled 9,10,11,...) that progressively expand the unbound first argument.

?- trace,sublist1([1,3],[1,2,3,4]).
Call: (8) sublist1([1, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Call: (9) append1(_G377, [1, 3], _G379) ? creep
Exit: (9) append1([], [1, 3], [1, 3]) ? creep
Call: (9) append1([1, 3], _G378, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Call: (10) append1([3], _G378, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (10) append1([3], _G378, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (9) append1([1, 3], _G378, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Redo: (9) append1(_G377, [1, 3], _G379) ? creep
Call: (10) append1(_G374, [1, 3], _G377) ? creep
Exit: (10) append1([], [1, 3], [1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (9) append1([_G373], [1, 3], [_G373, 1, 3]) ? creep
Call: (9) append1([_G373, 1, 3], _G384, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Call: (10) append1([1, 3], _G384, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (10) append1([1, 3], _G384, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (9) append1([_G373, 1, 3], _G384, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Redo: (10) append1(_G374, [1, 3], _G377) ? creep
Call: (11) append1(_G380, [1, 3], _G383) ? creep
Exit: (11) append1([], [1, 3], [1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (10) append1([_G379], [1, 3], [_G379, 1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (9) append1([_G373, _G379], [1, 3], [_G373, _G379, 1, 3]) ? creep
Call: (9) append1([_G373, _G379, 1, 3], _G390, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Call: (10) append1([_G379, 1, 3], _G390, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Call: (11) append1([1, 3], _G390, [3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (11) append1([1, 3], _G390, [3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (10) append1([_G379, 1, 3], _G390, [2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Fail: (9) append1([_G373, _G379, 1, 3], _G390, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
Redo: (11) append1(_G380, [1, 3], _G383) ? creep
Call: (12) append1(_G386, [1, 3], _G389) ? creep
Exit: (12) append1([], [1, 3], [1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (11) append1([_G385], [1, 3], [_G385, 1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (10) append1([_G379, _G385], [1, 3], [_G379, _G385, 1, 3]) ? creep
Exit: (9) append1([_G373, _G379, _G385], [1, 3], [_G373, _G379, _G385, 1, 3]) ? creep
Call: (9) append1([_G373, _G379, _G385, 1, 3], _G396, [1, 2, 3, 4]) ? creep
...

Anyway, I think that you have taken the right path to learn Prolog. It's correct to master usage of builtins, that behind deceptively simple definition often hide complex behaviour.

share|improve this answer

Using DCGs will represent the problem in the most graphical way possible:

... --> [] | [_], ... .

adjacent(X,Y,Seq) :- phrase((...,[X,Y],...), Seq).

Edit: Thanks to @fortran's comment, another definition might be:

adjacent(X,Y,Seq) :- phrase((...,( [X,Y] | [Y,X] ),...), Seq).
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.