Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider the code below in a single translation unit:

class C {
private:

    struct Init {

        Init() {
            /* compute data once here */
        }
    };
    static const Init& i;
    static int data[];
public:
    /* interface for reading data */
};

const C::Init& C::i = Init();
int C::data[200];
  1. Is C::i always initialized after C::data no matter the order of the definition of both?
  2. Is this solution the most elegant one for computing static data once?
share|improve this question
1  
Could you elaborate a bit on what you think the answers are to the questions you've proposed? –  Grammin Dec 2 '11 at 21:33
    
1. I think yes because of the types involved. data is int[], while i is const Init&, which maybe involves a more elaborate construction before main() but after other static data members of "basic" (POD?) types. I need a confirmation from the standard and the right terminology involved in the two types of objects. –  Martin Dec 2 '11 at 21:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

int C::data[200] is zero-initialized, which means that it is statically initialized. Static initialization comes before dynamic initialization. Since C::Init::Init() is not a constant expression, C::i is dynamically initialized, necessarily after C::data.

See 3.6.2 for details.

A bootleg quote:

Variables with static storage duration [...] shall be zero-initialized before any other initialization takes place. [...] Together, zero-initialization and constant initialization are called static initialization; all other initialization is dynamic initialization. Static initialization shall be performed before any dynamic initialization takes place.

share|improve this answer
    
Good thing that people like you exist here :) +1 –  FailedDev Dec 2 '11 at 21:40
    
It's worth noting that the order of static initialization is not defined, and neither need it be - all initial values of statically initialized variables are already known at compile time, so the order of their initialization cannot have any observable effects. –  Kerrek SB Dec 2 '11 at 21:44

C::data isn't initialized there, so order doesn't matter.

The shorter solution is to use static function and dummy variable:

class C {
private:

    static void Init() {
        /* compute data once here */
    }

    static bool data_init_helper;
    static int data[];
public:
    /* interface for reading data */
};

bool C::data_init_helper = (C::Init(), false);
int C::data[200];
share|improve this answer

Is C::i always initialized after C::data no matter the order of the definition of both?

The order is guaranteed if they are defined in the same compilation unit, otherwise not.

Is this solution the most elegant one for computing static data once?

No. If you really have to have it static, then a better way (and to prevent a possible static initialization order fiasco) is to do it like this :

struct someDataStr
{
  int data[200];
};
someDataStr& AccessData()
{
  static someDataStr *ptr = NULL;
  if ( NULL == ptr )
  {
    ptr = new someDataStr;
    // initialize value
  }
  return *ptr;
}

If it doesn't have to be static, then use dependency injection, and pass the object containing data to all classes using it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.