Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using diff with the -y and --suppress-common-lines options and the output is almost perfect except I'd like to see the line numbers of the changes.

Example:

file1:

line a
line b
line c

file2:

line a
line B
line c
line d

command and output:

$ diff -y --suppress-common-lines file1 file2
line b                                                        | line B
                                                              > line d

Is this combination of options possible with diff or do I need another tool?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unfortunately the -y option uses the formatting style internally (as does --LFMT-line-format), you cannot cumulate formatting commands with -y. You cannot obtain from formatting parameters what -y does, so you cannot workaround directly with diff (I checked diff 3.2 source code).

You need to use another tool.

share|improve this answer
    
I was fairly sure of this but thank you for confirming! Now to find another tool... –  Dave Forgac Dec 5 '11 at 13:21

If you are always comparing lines with the same line numbers, you can use something like this:

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[NR]=$0;next}{x=a[FNR];if($0!=x)printf("%s;%s;%s\n",FNR,x,$0)}' file1 file2
327;有る;ある
431;先ず;まず
543;連れて行く;連れていく
719;幾ら;いくら
1318;込む;混む
1415;かわいそう;可哀相
1713;だんだん;段々
2491;大みそか;大晦日
4120;もうける;儲ける
4510;ほほ笑む;微笑む
4512;もうかる;儲かる
5727;剥げる;剝げる

FNR (file number of record) is equal to NR when awk is processing the first file. The next statement skips to the next record.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.