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Why is my constructor still called even if the class and constructor case are different?

<?php
 abstract class foo {
  function foof() {
   echo "Hello, I'm foo :)";
  }
 }

 class foo2 extends foo {
  function foo2f() {
   $this->foof();
  }
 }

 class foo3 extends foo2 {
  function foo3f() {
   $this->foo2f();
  }
 }

 $x = new foo3;
 $x->foo3f();
?>

This code outputs "Hello, I'm foo :)" (as expected) but when I change code to something like this: http://pastebin.com/wNeyikpq

<?php
abstract class foo {
 function fooing() {
  echo "Hello, I'm foo :)";
 }
}

class foo2 extends foo {
 function foo2() {
  $this->fooing();
 }
}

class foo3 extends foo2 {
 function foo3() {
  $this->foo2();
 }
}

$x = new foo3;
$x->foo3();
?>

PHP prints:

Hello, I'm foo :)Hello, I'm foo :)

Why? Is it a bug?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by hakre, Anna Lear Dec 4 '11 at 0:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I put second code on pastebin due to stackoverflow bug (lol) - cl.ly/3J352B14073S15282O2s –  kiler129 Dec 2 '11 at 22:04
3  
This is not a bug in PHP, and that's not a bug in StackOverflow. –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 2 '11 at 22:14
4  
In general, you're going to draw the ire of people here if your question assumes (even if you just mention it in passing) that there's a bug in the language you're using, and not in the code you've written. –  jwiscarson Dec 2 '11 at 22:18

2 Answers 2

Because you are calling the foo2 two times, function foo2() in foo2 it's a constructor.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 This is correct. See Constructors and Destructors. –  Tim Cooper Dec 2 '11 at 22:06
6  
Note for passersby: A method of the same name as its class is treated as a constructor for backward compatibility with PHP4. Starting in PHP5, you should use the __construct() method instead. –  Wiseguy Dec 2 '11 at 22:07
1  
Thanks, I don't know that! –  kiler129 Dec 2 '11 at 22:09

The correct answer is not that function foo2() in foo2 it's a constructor, although it's true that it's a constructor.

The answer is that foo3() is the constructor called in new foo3(). This constructor calls the method foo2().

Actually the constructor of foo2 newer is called since foo3 has not a call to his parent constructor.


Because you are calling foo3() two times, function foo3() in foo3 is a constructor Docs:

For backwards compatibility, if PHP 5 cannot find a __construct() function for a given class, it will search for the old-style constructor function, by the name of the class.

First call:

$x = new foo3;

Second call:

$x->foo3f();

Give foo3 a real constructor and you're fine:

class foo3 extends foo2 {
 function __construct() {};
 function foo3() {
  $this->foo2();
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, you actually coined it correctly first. –  hakre Dec 2 '11 at 22:22

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