Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use a variable as the table name within a stored procedure and it's using it as a string literal instead of as the actual table name. Why is this? Is there another way I should be doing this (aside from just doing it in PHP)?

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS settonull;

DELIMITER //

CREATE PROCEDURE settonull()
BEGIN
  DECLARE done INT DEFAULT FALSE;
  DECLARE _tablename VARCHAR(255);
  DECLARE _columnname VARCHAR(255);
  DECLARE cur1 CURSOR FOR SELECT CONCAT(TABLE_SCHEMA, '.', TABLE_NAME) AS table_name, COLUMN_NAME AS column_name FROM information_schema.COLUMNS WHERE IS_NULLABLE = 'YES' AND TABLE_SCHEMA = 'blip_notify' AND table_name = 'notify_queue' LIMIT 1;

  DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = TRUE;

  OPEN cur1;

  read_loop: LOOP
    FETCH cur1 INTO _tablename, _columnname;

    IF done THEN
      LEAVE read_loop;
    END IF;

    UPDATE _tablename SET _columnname = NULL WHERE LENGTH(TRIM(_columnname)) = 0;

  END LOOP;

  CLOSE cur1;
END//

DELIMITER ;

CALL settonull();

Output:

0 row(s) affected, 1 warning(s)

Execution Time : 0 sec
Transfer Time  : 1.094 sec
Total Time     : 1.095 sec

Note Code : 1305
PROCEDURE settonull does not exist
---------------------------------------------------

0 row(s) affected

Execution Time : 0.002 sec
Transfer Time  : 1.011 sec
Total Time     : 1.014 sec
---------------------------------------------------

Query: call settonull()

Error Code: 1146
Table 'blip_notify._tablename' doesn't exist

Execution Time : 0 sec
Transfer Time  : 0 sec
Total Time     : 0.003 sec
---------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question
    
Note that I was trying this out in order to solve stackoverflow.com/questions/8362245/… –  hafichuk Dec 2 '11 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to use dynamic sql. ya, ugh.

SET @s = CONCAT('UPDATE ', _tablename, ' SET ', _columnname, ' = NULL WHERE LENGTH(TRIM(', _columnname, ')) = 0' );
PREPARE stmt FROM @s;
EXECUTE stmt;
share|improve this answer

Variables contain string values (or other data types), not table identifiers.

You can do what you want in a stored procedure if you concatenate the parts of the SQL query together as a string, and then PREPARE and EXECUTE that string as an SQL statement.

But FWIW, I would just do it in PHP.

Also be careful of SQL injection vulnerabilities when adding a table name dynamically to an SQL query, because escaping functions like mysql_real_escape_string() don't help for table names. See my solution for "Whitelist Maps" in my presentation SQL Injection Myths and Fallacies.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.