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Is the syntax of this query

SELECT * FROM  table1
WHERE var_c IN(
SELECT var_a FROM table2 
WHERE var_b =55554444
);

Equivalent to this?

SELECT table1.* FROM table1, table2
WHERE (table2.var_a=table1.var_c AND table2.var_b=55554444);

The first one takes about 7-8 seconds to run and the 2nd one takes about .75 seconds to run. When I use a Join statement it takes about 4-5 seconds to run.

Also is the syntax of this

DELETE FROM  table1
WHERE var_c IN(
SELECT var_a FROM table2 
WHERE var_b =55554444
);

And this:

DELETE table1.* FROM table1, table2
WHERE (table2.var_a=table1.var_c AND table2.var_b=55554444);

The same?

share|improve this question
    
How many rows do the tables have? What datatypes are the columns? What indexes do you have? –  ypercube Dec 2 '11 at 23:32
    
Can you post the EXPLAIN of the 2 queries? –  ypercube Dec 2 '11 at 23:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, the 2 queries are not equivalent. The second can return duplicate rows, if (var_a, var_b) is not UNIQUE in table2

The first query though:

SELECT * 
FROM  table1
WHERE var_c IN
      ( SELECT var_a 
        FROM table2 
        WHERE var_b =55554444
      )

and if table2.var_a does not contain any NULL values, then it's equivalent to this:

SELECT table1.* 
FROM table1
   , table2
WHERE table2.var_a = table1.var_c 
  AND table2.var_b = 55554444
GROUP BY table1.PK                --- Primary Key of table1

(which is better to be written with explicit JOIN syntax as:

SELECT table1.* 
FROM table1
  JOIN table2
    ON table2.var_a = table1.var_c 
WHERE table2.var_b = 55554444
GROUP BY table1.PK                --- Primary Key of table1

and this:

SELECT * 
FROM  table1
WHERE EXISTS 
      ( SELECT *
        FROM table2 
        WHERE table2.var_b = 55554444
          AND table2.var_a = table1.var_c
      )

About performance, the best advice you could get is to test, test and test again with your data. Try with different indexes and figure how to read the EXPLAIN plans.

You'll probably find that IN (SELECT ... FROM ...) has not the best performance with current MySQL optimizer (although I hear that MariaDB plans some major improvements in next release, Maria 5.3) and that JOIN and EXISTS variants perform usually better.

But this heavily depends on the indexes you have on the tables. Without any index, all of them will be slow. And query time < 1 sec does not mean it's fast. With a billion rows in the tables, yes, it's pretty good. For a table with only a few thousand rows, time < 0.01 sec should be expected.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 you are entirely correct, as I edited in my answer. The "correct" query depends on whether OP wants possible duplications from the JOIN but the explicit JOIN as you and I both noted is preferable to his syntax (though his may get converted by the RDBMS) –  Matthew Dec 2 '11 at 23:49
1  
It's more readable, especially if you have a lot of joins. It's easy to forget to write a condition on the WHERE when joining 10 tables. Also, it's needed when you want LEFT or RIGHT outer joins. –  ypercube Dec 3 '11 at 0:12
1  
Plus, it's in the SQL-92 standard (almost 20 years old now!) –  ypercube Dec 3 '11 at 0:13
1  
Another thing that is a limitation of the implicit join with WHERE is that essentially (as @Matthew had in his answer) a FROM tablea, b, c, ..., z WHERE a.id = b.id AND ... y.ff = z.ff is a CROSS JOIN of 2 or more tables with some conditions applied (not that this is how SQL-products implement it). –  ypercube Dec 3 '11 at 0:18
1  
With the explicit join syntax, you can have FROM (a JOIN b) JOIN c or FROM a JOIN (b JOIN c) or FROM (a JOIN b) LEFT JOIN c, etc. More flexibility. –  ypercube Dec 3 '11 at 0:20

This query is invalid DELETE * FROM table1, use DELETE FROM table1

share|improve this answer
    
Typo, changed. Are they the same now lol? –  user784637 Dec 2 '11 at 23:27

Try using an inner join:

SELECT * FROM  table1
INNER JOIN table2
ON table2.var_a = table1.var_c
WHERE table2.var_b =55554444
share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, joins shouldn't be slow. I have done triple joins on tables having more than 80,000 rows each. Check the structure of your database, and make sure the query doesn't return duplicate rows –  Sean H Jenkins Dec 2 '11 at 23:33
    
Comment removed, I was returning the results of a different table using the join statement. That's why it took like 5 seconds. When I tried it on the table I'm talking about in this example it took <1sec –  user784637 Dec 2 '11 at 23:40

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