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I'm calling either var_dump() or print_r() on an array that has one value in an echo statement:

echo "<br><br>testArray is ==> " . var_dump($testArray) . " <===<br><br>";

Here is the actual output in the browser:

array
0 => string '28' (length=2)


testArray is ==> <===

This is a nuance I don't get. To me, the order of execution is:

  1. echo executes and displays testArray is ==>
  2. the call to var_dump executes and displays the array contents
  3. then the <== should execute

Instead of seeing 1, 2 then 3 on the output, I'm seeing 2, 1, 3 in that order. This is one line of server-side code. What is this nuance?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They do it because they aren't returning data, they are echoing. You can do print_r($array, true) to make it return, but var_dump() will need output buffering.

If you want it to work the way you're trying to make it, separate them into distinct calls.

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2  
+1 The default behavior of var_dump and print_r has never made sense to me. That second parameter to print_r is a life saver. –  grossvogel Dec 3 '11 at 0:07
    
+1, +1, +1 I have up-arrowed everyone here, thanks, this is new to me as is a lot of php -- thanks. –  wantTheBest Dec 3 '11 at 0:14
1  
I have this bound to a textmate macro: ob_start();var_dump($var);error_log(ob_get_clean()); –  Francis Avila Dec 3 '11 at 0:32

var_dump doesn't return anything, it does its own printing. It evaluates first, since PHP can't concatenate an expression of which it doesn't know the value. You probably want:

echo "<br><br>testArray is ==> ";
var_dump($testArray);
echo " <===<br><br>";

instead. Print the start, the middle, then the end.

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minitech, I immediately tried jprofitt's solution and it worked but you have an equally good solution here, if I could accept yours also I would. I did up-arrow you. I have the opinion when a tie is obvious, SO needs to be modified to allow more than one 'accept' since you really cannot say "in every set of correct response one and only one is the best so it must be accepted.' –  wantTheBest Dec 3 '11 at 0:17

You can use the comma operator instead of the dot operator:

echo "<pre>" . var_dump($cal) . "</pre>";

object(Calendar)#2 
<pre>
</pre>

echo "<pre>" , var_dump($cal) , "</pre>";

<pre>object(Calendar)#2 
</pre>
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