Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do I need to include type="value" in my page when linking my external style sheet or script? I thought I heard it was no longer needed in HTML5. I still see it in some HTML files. Still learning. Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4195427/… –  simshaun Dec 3 '11 at 1:24
2  
Not quite a duplicate; the other question is only about script tags. –  Jacob Dec 3 '11 at 1:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's not needed in HTML5 but in HTML<=4 or XHTML it's required.

share|improve this answer
    
Pallazo that is what I was wondering. Thanks. –  Midtone Dec 3 '11 at 4:38

No, it is no longer required. The MIME type is also sent via the HTTP Content-Type header, so using type="text/css" would only be extra bytes.

share|improve this answer

The rules for each different element are varying in HTML5.

The <script> element has a default value of type="text/javascript" defined for the element:

The type attribute gives the language of the script or format of the data. If the attribute is present, its value must be a valid MIME type. The charset parameter must not be specified. The default, which is used if the attribute is absent, is "text/javascript".

The <link> element merely uses the attribute as a 'hint' to the browser:

For external resource links, the type attribute is used as a hint to user agents so that they can avoid fetching resources they do not support. If the attribute is present, then the user agent must assume that the resource is of the given type (even if that is not a valid MIME type, e.g. the empty string). If the attribute is omitted, but the external resource link type has a default type defined, then the user agent must assume that the resource is of that type. If the UA does not support the given MIME type for the given link relationship, then the UA should not obtain the resource; if the UA does support the given MIME type for the given link relationship, then the UA should obtain the resource at the appropriate time as specified for the external resource link's particular type. If the attribute is omitted, and the external resource link type does not have a default type defined, but the user agent would obtain the resource if the type was known and supported, then the user agent should obtain the resource under the assumption that it will be supported.

User agents must not consider the type attribute authoritative — upon fetching the resource, user agents must not use the type attribute to determine its actual type. Only the actual type (as defined in the next paragraph) is used to determine whether to apply the resource, not the aforementioned assumed type.

The <style> element is similar to a script, with a default value of type="text/css":

The type attribute gives the styling language. If the attribute is present, its value must be a valid MIME type that designates a styling language. The charset parameter must not be specified. The default value for the type attribute, which is used if the attribute is absent, is "text/css".

You can find all the information you need at the HTML5 specifications.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer. Very helpful. –  Midtone Dec 3 '11 at 4:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.