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I am trying to read each line of a textfile which each line contains one word and put those words into a vector. How would i go about doing that?

This is my new code: I think there is still something wrong with it.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    std::string line;
    vector<string> DataArray;
    vector<string> QueryArray;
    ifstream myfile("OHenry.txt");
    ifstream qfile("queries.txt");

    if(!myfile) //Always test the file open.
    {
        cout<<"Error opening output file"<<endl;
        system("pause");
        return -1;
    }
    while (std::getline(qfile, line))
    {
        QueryArray.push_back(line);
    }
    if(!qfile) //Always test the file open.
    {
        cout<<"Error opening output file"<<endl;
        system("pause");
        return -1;
    }

    while (std::getline(qfile, line))
    {
        QueryArray.push_back(line);
    }

    cout<<QueryArray[0]<<endl;
    cout<<DataArray[0]<<endl;

}
share|improve this question
1  
What do you have problem with the so far code ? –  Mahesh Dec 3 '11 at 2:32
    
@Mahesh this if(!myfile) might be the first problem. (I'm sorry.. need to learn STL.) –  Beginner Dec 3 '11 at 2:34
    
@RomanB: There's nothing wrong with that line. –  DeadMG Dec 3 '11 at 2:36
    
@DeadMG Now it was the moment I understood why operator overloading is so criticized. –  Beginner Dec 3 '11 at 2:37
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

@FailedDev did, indeed, list the simplest form. As an alternative, here is how I often code that loop:

std::vector<std::string> myLines;
std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(myfile),
          std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
          std::back_inserter(myLines));

The entire program might look like this:

// Avoid "using namespace std;" at all costs. Prefer typing out "std::"
// in front of each identifier, but "using std::NAME" isn't (very) dangerous.
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::cin;
#include <fstream>
using std::ifstream;
#include <string>
using std::string;
#include <vector>
using std::vector;
#include <iterator>
using std::istream_iterator;
#include <algorithm>
using std::copy;

int main()
{

    // Store the words from the two files into these two vectors
    vector<string> DataArray;
    vector<string> QueryArray;

    // Create two input streams, opening the named files in the process.
    // You only need to check for failure if you want to distinguish
    // between "no file" and "empty file". In this example, the two
    // situations are equivalent.
    ifstream myfile("OHenry.txt"); 
    ifstream qfile("queries.txt");

    // std::copy(InputIt first, InputIt last, OutputIt out) copies all
    //   of the data in the range [first, last) to the output iterator "out"
    // istream_iterator() is an input iterator that reads items from the
    //   named file stream
    // back_inserter() returns an interator that performs "push_back"
    //   on the named vector.
    copy(istream_iterator<string>(myfile),
         istream_iterator<string>(),
         back_inserter(DataArray));
    copy(istream_iterator<string>(qfile),
         istream_iterator<string>(),
         back_inserter(QueryArray));

    try {
        // use ".at()" and catch the resulting exception if there is any
        // chance that the index is bogus. Since we are reading external files,
        // there is every chance that the index is bogus.
        cout<<QueryArray.at(20)<<"\n";
        cout<<DataArray.at(12)<<"\n";
    } catch(...) {
        // deal with error here. Maybe:
        //   the input file doesn't exist
        //   the ifstream creation failed for some other reason
        //   the string reads didn't work
        cout << "Data Unavailable\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what includes and namespaces do i need? –  user977154 Dec 3 '11 at 3:31
    
sweet got it to work. Thank you so much. This definitly is sooo much easier and cleaner. –  user977154 Dec 3 '11 at 3:36
    
@user977154 see complete example above –  Robᵩ Dec 3 '11 at 3:42
    
@user977154 I am positive you have no idea how it works. Do you? –  FailedDev Dec 3 '11 at 3:42
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Simplest form:

std::string line;
std::vector<std::string> myLines;
while (std::getline(myfile, line))
{
   myLines.push_back(line);
}

No need for crazy c thingies :)

Edit:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()

{
    std::string line;
    std::vector<std::string> DataArray;
    std::vector<std::string> QueryArray;
    std::ifstream myfile("OHenry.txt");
    std::ifstream qfile("queries.txt");

    if(!myfile) //Always test the file open.
    {
        std::cout<<"Error opening output file"<< std::endl;
        system("pause");
        return -1;
    }
    while (std::getline(myfile, line))
    {
        DataArray.push_back(line);
    }

    if(!qfile) //Always test the file open.
    {
        std::cout<<"Error opening output file"<<std::endl;
        system("pause");
        return -1;
    }

    while (std::getline(qfile, line))
    {
        QueryArray.push_back(line);
    }

    std::cout<<QueryArray[20]<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<DataArray[12]<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Keyword using is illegal C++! Never use it. OK? Good. Now compare what I wrote with what you wrote and try to find out the differences. If you still have questions come back.

share|improve this answer
    
i fixed the code in my post, what am i doing wrong now? because i need to work with two different text files. Thank you so much for the help by the way. –  user977154 Dec 3 '11 at 3:15
    
@user977154 You don't need the outer while loop. Remove it! In both cases. Also are you sure there exist 12 and 20 lines in your vectors? –  FailedDev Dec 3 '11 at 3:19
    
Yes i am positive there are more than 20 filled lines in my test files. And i keep getting error saying error opening output file –  user977154 Dec 3 '11 at 3:25
    
Waitaminute. I know this is a old post - but this is dangerous. In what way is the keyword 'using' ILLEGAL in C++? Using was introduced into the language together with namespaces. "using std::cout" is perfectly valid. "using std" is perfectly valid, albeit bad practice. –  gamers2000 Apr 1 '13 at 13:43
    
@gamers2000 Was being sarcastic. int * aPtr = NULL; *aPtr = 5; // is also perfectly valid but should be considered illegal... –  FailedDev Apr 1 '13 at 22:31
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Simplest version:

std::vector<std::string> lines;
for (std::string line; std::getline( ifs, line ); /**/ )
   lines.push_back( line );

I'm omitting the includes and other gunk. My version is almost the same as FailedDev's but by using a 'for' loop I put the declaration of 'line' in the loop. This is not just a trick to reduce the line count. Doing this reduces the scope of line -- it disappears after the for loop. All variables should have the smallest scope possible, so therefore this is better. For loops are awesome.

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