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I have been learning C++ for a while now, and so far I love it. But I have been stuck at the console application level. I have built C# programs for a few years so I love having a GUI and not do everything via console.

Console programs when compiled will work on both windows and linux, which is great. When I was searching GUI C++ tutorials I could only find tutorials for windows specific GUI applications.

So my question is this, can you program a GUI in C++ that when compiled with run on both windows and linux? If this is not possible, can someone point me to a great place to learn windows and linux GUI?

Thank You!

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just to add this here for the community. If you write it in managed c++, using the System.Windows.Forms lib, it will run in mac or linux via mono. However, you still have to recompile it, and managed c++ is silly--by that point, you should just use C# anyways. – Jonathan Henson Jan 3 '12 at 5:27
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I suggest you to use Qt by Nokia:

http://qt.nokia.com/products/

It is free, very powerful, very easy to use, and well designed. And there is also a Visual Studio Add-in available:

http://developer.qt.nokia.com/wiki/QtVSAddin

but you can use their own cross-platform IDE called Qt Creator as well.

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You can use wxWidget library.

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Yes, you need to use a cross platform GUI toolkit like WxWidgets

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gtk and gtkmm http://www.gtkmm.org/en/

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Indeed, using cross-platform GUI libraries (like Qt, Gtk, WxWidgets) help you to have the same source code working on Linux and Windows. I recommend Qt if coding in C++.

But there is no way to build an executable working on both systems (unless you use wine to emulate Windows on Linux, which I don't recommend in your case).

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