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I've got silly magic problem in rails!

So, I've created table with foreign key (I'm using sparkfly-foreigner gem).

class CreateCourses < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :courses do |t|
      t.string :coursename,
      t.integer :subject,
      t.integer :theme,
      t.integer :hours,
      t.decimal :price,
      t.foreign_key :subject, :column => :subject, :dependent => :delete
      t.foreign_key :theme, :column => :theme, :dependent => :delete
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

It works fine in terminal and in my rails webapp.

Then I'm creating another table.

class CreateGroupps < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :groupps do |t|
      t.string :groupname
      t.integer :courseid
      t.integer :number,
      t.foreign_key :course, :column => :courseid, :dependent => :delete
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

And there magic begins. I'm writing not existing courseid in the web form for Groupps, and it CREATES RECORD IN THE DATABASE!!! When I'm using terminal, i get this

rails_dev=> select * from groupps
rails_dev-> ;
 id | groupname | courseid | number |         created_at         |         updated_at         
----+-----------+----------+--------+----------------------------+----------------------------
  1 | 12        |          |      1 | 2011-12-03 02:51:06.154261 | 2011-12-03 02:51:06.154261
(1 row)

rails_dev=> insert into groupps values (2,12,0,0);                                                                                                                                                          ERROR:  insert or update on table "groupps" violates foreign key constraint "groupps_courseid_fkey"
DETAIL:  Key (courseid)=(0) is not present in table "courses".

How it could be possible? And when I'm wrong? I'm too newbie in rails and ruby.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This output:

 id | groupname | courseid | number |         created_at         |         updated_at         
----+-----------+----------+--------+----------------------------+----------------------------
  1 | 12        |          |      1 | 2011-12-03 02:51:06.154261 | 2011-12-03 02:51:06.154261
(1 row)

indicates that you have a NULL in courseid and that's just fine as far as your table and foreign key are concerned. You're allowed to have a NULL in a referencing column, you probably want to add :null => false to your courseid:

create_table :groupps do |t|
  t.string :groupname
  t.integer :courseid, :null => false
  t.integer :number,
  t.foreign_key :course, :column => :courseid, :dependent => :delete
  t.timestamps
end

BTW, since you're already in psql, you can use \d groupps to see your table's structure, constraints (include FKs), and even which FKs refer to your table. You might also be interested in \pset null:

null
Sets the string to be printed in place of a null value. The default is to print nothing, which can easily be mistaken for an empty string. For example, one might prefer \pset null '(null)'.

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Thank you:) I knew that solution must be simple and also there will be my stupid mistake. –  evilgeniuz Dec 3 '11 at 9:44

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