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I am trying to programatically unzip a zipped file.

I have tried using the System.IO.Compression.GZipStream class in .NET, but when my app runs (actually a unit test) I get this exception:

System.IO.InvalidDataException: The magic number in GZip header is not correct. Make sure you are passing in a GZip stream..

I now realize that a .zip file is not the same as a .gz file, and that GZip is not the same as Zip.

However, since I'm able to extract the file by manually double clicking the zipped file and then clicking the "Extract all files"-button, I think there should be a way of doing that in code as well.

Therefore I've tried to use Process.Start() with the path to the zipped file as input. This causes my app to open a Window showing the contents in the zipped file. That's all fine, but the app will be installed on a server with none around to click the "Extract all files"-button.

So, how do I get my app to extract the files in the zipped files?

Or is there another way to do it? I prefer doing it in code, without downloading any third party libraries or apps; the security department ain't too fancy about that...

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6  
Your security department is happier with you writing your own code for something than using a library that has been debugged and looked at by presumably many eyes? You can use a library AND "do it in code" (get the source and compile it yourself) but I see reinventing the wheel as a bigger problem than any security issues brought about by using a tried and true library. –  Jared Updike May 7 '09 at 20:10
4  
@Jared - When management gets an idea in their head... –  SnOrfus May 7 '09 at 20:16
2  
There is less risk for security department if you get a third party product. Just download dotnetzip and rename it "[insert company name].ziplibrary.dll" –  Simon May 7 '09 at 21:41
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8 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

We have used SharpZipLib successfully on many projects. I know it's a third party tool, but source code is included and could provide some insight if you chose to reinvent the wheel here.

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3  
I tried using SharpZipLib and it worked fine. I guess I'll have to see if the prohibition against third party libs and apss is a strict rule or more of a guidline. –  Petteri May 7 '09 at 21:49
7  
I don't know about your company, but my experience has always been that it's possible to get an exception to that sort of rule if you write up a business case description of why you want the exception. Point out the cost savings v. DIY, as well as the fact that the source can be examined. As a fallback, you can often get permission to use the source even if they won't let you use the dll--then just compile it yourself (or at least the parts you actually need to use...). –  RolandTumble May 7 '09 at 22:09
    
thanks Chris for the link of that lib. –  Annie Dec 9 '11 at 3:49
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With .NET 4.5 you can now unzip files using the .NET framework:

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      string startPath = @"c:\example\start";
      string zipPath = @"c:\example\result.zip";
      string extractPath = @"c:\example\extract";

      System.IO.Compression.ZipFile.CreateFromDirectory(startPath, zipPath);
      System.IO.Compression.ZipFile.ExtractToDirectory(zipPath, extractPath);
    }
  }
}

The above code was taken directly from Microsoft's documentation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms404280(v=vs.110).aspx

ZipFile is contained in the assembly System.IO.Compression.FileSystem. (Thanks nateirvin...see comment below)

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finally a perfect solution :) –  mikus Feb 12 '13 at 11:20
13  
BTW, ZipFile is contained in the assembly System.IO.Compression.FileSystem. –  nateirvin Feb 13 '13 at 23:08
4  
Which means that you need to add a DLL reference to the framework assembly System.IO.Compression.FileSystem.dll. –  Pauly Glott Aug 13 '13 at 23:50
    
thank you, this answer helped me ! –  Rajesh Apr 16 at 11:21
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Use the DotNetZip library at http://www.codeplex.com/DotNetZip

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1  
Hmmm... But that's a third party library! –  Petteri May 7 '09 at 20:51
18  
How very observant of you. Unless you feel like spending several months implemening your own Zip file reader, its your best option. –  Dan-o May 7 '09 at 21:08
    
This one is way better than SharpZipLib –  Kugel Oct 2 '13 at 3:55
    
@Dan-o Why not Microsoft Compression? nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.Bcl.Compression –  Mikael Dúi Bolinder Mar 11 at 0:32
    
Your're asking me questions about an answer that is nearly 5 years old. Do some research. I'm sure you will find an answer. –  Dan-o Mar 11 at 22:28
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Free, and no external DLL files. Everything is in one CS file. One download is just the CS file, another download is a very easy to understand example. Just tried it today and I can't believe how simple the setup was. It worked on first try, no errors, no nothing.

http://zipstorer.codeplex.com/

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1  
This is an awesome solution. I don't know why this didn't get more traction? –  c00000fd Nov 3 '13 at 2:13
1  
Yeah, agree. This is the best answer. –  mjb Nov 20 '13 at 14:06
    
Great! One file, no bloated library, that's all we need. And you can study the algorithm. –  oyophant Mar 11 at 9:47
    
Spoke too soon! I want to inflate the files from an http download stream instantly. This does not work since it is using Seek operations on the stream :( Well, thanks to the source code I can write my own ZipStream now... –  oyophant Mar 11 at 10:34
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Standard zip files normally use the deflate algorithm.

To extract files without using third party libraries use DeflateStream. You'll need a bit more information about the zip file archive format as Microsoft only provides the compression algorithm.

You may also try using zipfldr.dll. It is Microsoft's compression library (compressed folders from the Send to menu). It appears to be a com library but it's undocumented. You may be able to get it working for you through experimentation.

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I'm trying out the DeflateStream class. This time I get System.IO.InvalidDataException: Block length does not match with its complement.. –  Petteri May 7 '09 at 20:48
    
As I said above, Microsoft only provided the algorithm. You'll need info on the zip archive format as well. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_(file_format) should get you started. See the references at the bottom of the page for links to more detailed info. –  Kenneth Cochran May 7 '09 at 20:58
2  
I also stumbled acrossed System.IO.Packaging.Package in .NET 3.5. It looks like it may do the trick though its not very intuitive. –  Kenneth Cochran May 7 '09 at 21:01
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From here :

Compressed GZipStream objects written to a file with an extension of .gz can be decompressed using many common compression tools; however, this class does not inherently provide functionality for adding files to or extracting files from .zip archives.

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I use this to either zip or unzip multiple files. The Regex stuff is not required, but I use it to change the date stamp and remove unwanted underscores. I use the empty string in the Compress >> zipPath string to prefix something to all files if required. Also, I usually comment out either Compress() or Decompress() based on what I am doing.

using System;
using System.IO.Compression;
using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace ZipAndUnzip
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var directoryPath = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\your_path\");

            Compress(directoryPath);
            Decompress(directoryPath);
        }

        public static void Compress(DirectoryInfo directoryPath)
        {
            foreach (DirectoryInfo directory in directoryPath.GetDirectories())
            {
                var path = directoryPath.FullName;
                var newArchiveName = Regex.Replace(directory.Name, "[0-9]{8}", "20130913");
                newArchiveName = Regex.Replace(newArchiveName, "[_]+", "_");
                string startPath = path + directory.Name;
                string zipPath = path + "" + newArchiveName + ".zip";

                ZipFile.CreateFromDirectory(startPath, zipPath);
            }

        }

        public static void Decompress(DirectoryInfo directoryPath)
        {
            foreach (FileInfo file in directoryPath.GetFiles())
            {
                var path = directoryPath.FullName;
                string zipPath = path + file.Name;
                string extractPath = Regex.Replace(path + file.Name, ".zip", "");

                ZipFile.ExtractToDirectory(zipPath, extractPath);
            }
        }


    }
}
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I found out about this one (Unzip package on NuGet) today, since I ran into a hard bug in DotNetZip, and I realized there hasn't been really that much work done on DotNetZip for the last two years.

The Unzip package is lean, and it did the job for me - it didn't have the bug that DotNetZip had. Also, it was a reasonably small file, relying upon the Microsoft BCL for the actual decompression. I could easily make adjustments which I needed (to be able to keep track of the progress while decompressing). I recommend it.

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