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I'm new to Rails, and I'm coming to it from a Django background. I've come to terms with the fact that models and the database schema are separate in Rails, online Django. However, I'm still getting to grips with migrations.

My question is fairly simple - how do I add a relationship to a model using a migration? For example, I have Artist and Song as empty models that subclass ActiveRecord::Base at the moment, with no relationships whatsoever.

I need to move to doing this:

class Artist < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :songs
end

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :artist
end

But how do I change the schema to reflect this using rails g migrate? I'm using Rails 3.1.3.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to add the foreign key in your migration file, something like this:

def change
  create_table :songs do |t|
    t.references :artist
  end

  add_index :songs, :artist_id
end
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OK - and what if it's an existing table, do I need to use something other than create_table? –  Sam Dec 3 '11 at 15:19
1  
In that case you can use add_column :songs, :artist_id, :int, or if you want to make several changes on your table, change_table, with a syntax like the above. You can read more about migrations here: guides.rubyonrails.org/migrations.html –  rabusmar Dec 3 '11 at 15:22
    
Thanks. I used change_table, but now when I go to "Songs" in ActiveAdmin, I get no such column: artists.song_id. Have I done something wrong? That column shouldn't exist, as an artist can have many songs... –  Sam Dec 3 '11 at 15:29
    
Weird, if the association is the one that you posted, it should look for a the column songs.artist_id, not the other way around. –  rabusmar Dec 3 '11 at 15:38
    
Hmm, I looked at schema.rb and can see the artist_id column in the songs table, but artists remains the same as it used to be - which is correct. Any ideas? –  Sam Dec 3 '11 at 15:58
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Now, in Rails 4 you can do:

class AddProcedureIdToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_reference :users, :procedure, index: true
  end
end

to an existing Model

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