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I declared a structure with the new "game_struct". It has these contents :

struct game_struct{

scene scene_container[10]; 

player cPlayer;;

scene scene_one;

this->scene_container[0] = scene_one; 
this->scene_container[0].image = " "; 
this->scene_container[0].scene_message = "Welcome to the home screen of the game."; 


};

It gives the error "Expected unqualified-id before 'this'". I have been trying to fix it, but I cannot figure it out. Any advice would be much appreciated.

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I don't think you can use "this" pointer here. Try to use it in functions defined in struct declaration. –  winch Dec 3 '11 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
this->scene_container[0] = scene_one; 
this->scene_container[0].image = " "; 
this->scene_container[0].scene_message = "Welcome to the home screen of the game.";

You can't use this outside of a function of game_struct

Probably what you wanted to do is :

struct game_struct{

scene scene_container[10]; 

player cPlayer;

scene scene_one;

game_struct(){
   this->scene_container[0] = scene_one; 
   this->scene_container[0].image = " "; 
   this->scene_container[0].scene_message = "Welcome to the home screen of the game."; 
}


};
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How is it outside the declaration of Game Struct? It is within the curly braces... –  Monkeyanator Dec 3 '11 at 15:22
    
Ohhh! I see now! Tyvm. –  Monkeyanator Dec 3 '11 at 15:22
    
IT WORKS! IT WORKS I SAY! –  Monkeyanator Dec 3 '11 at 15:23
1  
I have to wait eight minutes before I can thank you. –  Monkeyanator Dec 3 '11 at 15:24
    
@Monkeyanator A declaration is different than inside a function right? this is implicitly passed to all non static function calls of a member function of an object. –  FailedDev Dec 3 '11 at 15:24

The above solution, scene_container[0] and scene_one do NOT reference the same scene. scene_container is simply copy assigned from scene_one, which is pointless because they are both being default constructed upon construction of game_struct. This is much better:

struct game_struct {

        scene scene_container[10];

    player cPlayer;

    scene* scene_one;

    game_struct() {
        scene_one = scene_container; // points to first element
        scene_one->image = " ";
        scene_one->scene_message =
                "Welcome to the home screen of the game.";
    }

};

Edit: well i was hoping I wouldn't have to spell it out. But seeming as this is my first negative, I guess I'll have to:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct scene {
    string image;
    string scene_message;
};
struct player {};

struct game_struct {

    scene scene_container[10];

    player cPlayer;

    scene scene_one;

    game_struct() /* all members are default constructed PRIOR TO ENTERING constructor block */
    {
        this->scene_container[0] = scene_one; /* this is not copy constructing, this is
            COPY ASSIGNING two identically constructed
            scene objects. All it does it non static member
            copy assignment for every member of scene_container[0] */
        this->scene_container[0].image = " ";
        this->scene_container[0].scene_message =
                "Welcome to the home screen of the game.";
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    game_struct gs;
    cout << "scene_one.scene_message : " << gs.scene_one.scene_message << endl;
    cout << "scene_container[0].scene_message : " << gs.scene_container[0].scene_message << endl;
}

This gives, unsurprisingly:

scene_one.scene_message : 
scene_container[0].scene_message : Welcome to the home screen of the game.
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2  
Rewiring the logic of the OP's code to fix a minor compiler error is not an acceptable answer, especially when that involves poor features like array-to-pointer decay, which should be kept six miles away from anyone who can't solve the problem the OP had on his own. –  Puppy Dec 3 '11 at 15:43
    
And yet if Monkeyanator were to edit via scene_one reference and then read via scene_container[0] (say, in some iterator) he'd be in for quite a shock. So far as I can tell he wants a convenience pointer within the class itself, and I gave the code to do that. –  Ian Haggerty Dec 3 '11 at 15:58

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