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I am doing a book exercise (not homework, since i'm self-learning) in which I'm supposed to write a telephone book using an array of type struct. So I defined:

typedef struct contact {

    char cFirstName[10];
    char cLastName[10];
    char iTelphone[12];

} address ; // end type

Next, I defined:

address myContacts[5] = { 
                        { 
                { '\0' }  // inner most braces, 
                          // tell gcc to put 0 in all
                      // members of each struct ?
                }  // first braces, tell gcc we have a 
                   // a struct as array member
                }; // outer most braces, tell gcc we have 
                   // an array

Now I have a function which prints the array content. However, I don't want to print all the array, because I'm only interested in array elements who's members are not empty. So I tried the following:

void printContacts( address * myContacts ){
    printf("Inside printContacts");
    int i = 0;

    while ( i < 5 ) {
        if (myContacts[i].cFirstName == NULL )
            printf("%s", myContacts[i].cFirstName); //does not work

        if (myContacts[i].cFirstName == '\0' )
            printf("%s", myContacts[i].cFirstName); //does not work

        if (myContacts[i].cFirstName[0] != 0 )
        {
            printf("%s", myContacts[i].cFirstName ); //does work!   
        }
        i++;
    }
}

So, my questions are:

  1. Am I initializing the array elements members to be really Null (e.g cFirstName[10]) ?
  2. Is there a better way ?
  3. How can I check that an array element member is empty ?

Thanks in advance for your answers!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, my questions are:

Am I initializing the array elements members to be really null (e.g cFirstName[10]) ?
Is there a better way ?
How can I check that an array element member is empty ?

Thanks in advance for your answers!

What you have done in initializing your struct array could be improved upon.

The first brace says, "initialize the array with my contents:"

address myContacts[5] = { ... }

The second set of braces says, "initialize the first struct in the array with the following:"

address myContacts[5] = { 
    { ... } ,   // each of these braces initializes a different struct in the 
    { ... } ,   // array (there are five inner brace sets as there are five  
    { ... } ,   // structs in the array).
    { ... } ,
    { ... }
 }

Note that it is good form to initialize all of your array elements at once, or to use a for loop to do so. This is why your original initialization confuses me; I'm not sure it is "correct", even if it runs.

Then, you put more braces inside of those (if you still want to do brace initialization for this application) to initialize the arrays in the struct:

address myContacts[5] = { 
    {{'\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0'},
     {'\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0'},
     {'\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0', '\0, '\0', '\0'} },
     .
     .
     .
 }

That is the way to "zero out" your array first using bracket notation. Not too many people do it; it gets tedious. Usually, for a real application people would use the heap (memory that you can allocate on-the-fly, as shown below) for something like this, in which case you could simply use pointers in your struct:

typedef struct contact {

    char *cFirstName;
    char *cLastName;
    char *iTelphone;

} address ; // end type

You would then allocate a contacts list:

address *myContacts = (address*) malloc(sizeof(address)*5); 
                      // the above allocates a five-element array
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    myContacts[i].cFirstName = NULL;
    myContacts[i].cLastName = NULL;
    myContacts[i].iTelephone = NULL;
}

allocate strings when you need to add to the address book:

myContacts[0].cFirstName = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char)*20);
strcpy(myContacts[0].cFirstName,"Tom, Dick, or Harry");

and when you're done, free everything you've allocated:

int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    if (myContacts[i].cFirstName != NULL) // since we initialized all pointers 
    {                                     // to null, this only isn't null when
        free(myContacts[i].cFirstName);   // it's been previously allocated
    }
    if (myContacts[i].cLastName != NULL)
    {                                    
        free(myContacts[i].cLastName);   
    }
    if (myContacts[i].iTelephone != NULL) 
    {                                     
        free(myContacts[i].iTelephone);   
    }
}

This allows you to create variable-length strings, arbitrarily large contact lists, and if you want to check to see if an entry is empty, simply check to see if it's pointer is null:

if (myContacts[i].cFirstName != NULL)
{
    printf("%s", myContacts[i].cFirstName ); //does work!
}

I hope this concept at least proves useful to you, even if you don't end up using malloc (there are good reasons for or against using it in every program). :)

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Thanks for the comprehensive answer! I actually want to accept everyone's answers. There is so much to learn about C and the 2 books I'm using don't show all these nuances! –  Oz123 Dec 3 '11 at 17:13

Your ïnitialization method is somehow unusual for which is essentially zeroing the struct, with memset(&MyContacts,0,sizeof(address)*5) you can can put to NULL, everything on your struct.

You can't check if an array is "empty", since NULL is a valid element in general terms. If you establish that only a C string will be contained on the array,Then you only have to check if the first element is NULL or not. Since all C strings are always terminated on NULL, which means that you must always add a terminating NULL at the end of your string.

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memset(&MyContacts,0,sizeof(address) only initialize an address, not 5 all. :) –  Summer_More_More_Tea Dec 3 '11 at 16:05
    
Added the mult by 5 –  RedComet Dec 3 '11 at 16:20

You're actually creating your struct and paddint it with 0, hence, the condition myContacts[i].cFirstName == NULL will never be true because you are creating an static array, it would work only if you declared cFirstName as a pointer (char*) in your struct.

Also, your second condition is essentially the same as the first, since NULL is only a preprocessor constant for 0.

To test if a string is empty, usually the first char is compared to 0, as in your last test.

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Am I initializing the array elements members to be really Null (e.g cFirstName[10]) ?

You basically assign thefirst character of the string buffer to '\0' (or equivalently 0.)

For example, the value of name variable below refers to pointer to the string buffer. So in this case if you compare the pointer with 0 or '\0', they will not be equal.

int i;
char name[10] = {'\0'};

printf("Raw content: ");
for(i = 0 ; i < 10 ; ++i)
    printf("%2d ", name[i]);
printf("\n\n");

printf("name = %p\n\n", name);
printf("*name = %d, name[0] = %d\n\n", *name, name[0]);

This gives:

Raw content:  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0

name = 0012FF48

*name = 0, name[0] = 0

If instead the name is set to "Hello":

Raw content: 72 101 108 108 111  0  0  0  0  0

name = 0012FF48

*name = 72, name[0] = 72

Is there a better way ?

Not sure if I got your question correctly: To ensure that every element of an array x is set to value y, you can use memset function.

How can I check that an array element member is empty ?

To check for empty string, you may use strlen function to find out the length of '\0'-terminated string.

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You should check myContacts[i].cFirstName[0] since myContacts[i].cFirstName is a pointer to char array.


Detailed explanation

For your first question: Yes, you already initialize all elements of myContacts empty. The reason why first two tests fail is that myContacts[i].cFirstName is a pointer to char array, which is not NULL. When you define the myContacts array, it resides on stack and myContacts[i] points to some place/address on the stack, which is not NULL.

The second: you can also initialize the array by

address myContacts[5]; // define an address array with 5 elements
memset((void*)myContacts, 0, sizeof(myContacts));

But have no idea which one is better in efficiency.

share|improve this answer
    
Your also initialize only the first. –  RedComet Dec 3 '11 at 16:18
    
@RedComet check it. :) –  Summer_More_More_Tea Dec 3 '11 at 16:21

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