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I'm using a map to store a bunch of keys and values. I want to use find() to find the key and return the value. Unfortunately, when I can't find the key, it get's upset. How can I make it return 0 if no key is found?

 int bag::getItem( const string item)
 {
    return this->bagItems.find(item)->second;
    return 0;
 }

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

map::find returns the value of map::end() if the value was not found. That's an iterator value that you cannot dereference, so blindly doing bagItems.find(item)->second is a no-no.

Instead, check the return value and act accordingly:

int bag::getItem( const string item) 
{ 
    // We don't know what CONST_ITERATOR_TYPE is, but you do
    CONST_ITERATOR_TYPE i = this->bagItems.find(item);
    return i == this->bagItems.end() ? 0 : i->second;
} 

To do this, you 'll want to have a local variable of const_iterator type; however, that type depends on the template arguments of your map (which we don't know). So you will have to fill the blank in yourself.

If you are in the pleasant position of using a C++11 compiler, the convenient

auto i = this->bagItems.find(item);

will work.

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isn't the Const_Iterator_Type = map? – Lexicon Dec 3 '11 at 16:15
    
@Lexicon: No, it's map<K, V>::const_iterator, where K and V are the same types you use to declare the map member. – Jon Dec 3 '11 at 16:17
    
'return bagitems[item]'? – Mooing Duck Dec 3 '11 at 16:26
    
@MooingDuck: That modifies the map by adding the key item with a default-constructed value if it did not already exist. – Jon Dec 3 '11 at 16:29
    
Right right, good point – Mooing Duck Dec 3 '11 at 16:33

you have to check the return value (it is an iterator) if it has found something:

int bag::getItem(const string & item) const
{
    map<string, int>::const_iterator iter = this->bagItems.find(item);
    return iter != this->bagItems.end() ? iter->second: 0;
}
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You should add a check in getItem() method to see if the call to find() returned a bagItems.end(). If it did, you know the item was not found.

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int bag::getItem( const string item)
{

map::const_iterator iter =  this->bagItems.find(item); //correct type here ;]
if(iter != this.bagItems.end())
    return iter->second;

return 0;

}
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You have to check if the iterator is not at the end of the container

int bag::getItem( const string item)
 {
  {the type of bagItems}::const_iterator it ;
  it = bagItems.find(item) ;
  if ( it == bagItems.end()) {
    return 0;
  } else  {
      return bagItems.find(item)->second;
  }

 }
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