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Say I have the following class with a method returning a list:

Class C():
  def f():
    return [1,2,3]

If I loop over the this method as follows:

c=C()
for i in c.f():
  print i

Inside the for loop, will c.f() be executed multiple times? If yes, in order to get it once, do I have to do assignment outside of the loop, or there is some trivial way?

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2  
Everyone's been pointing out the syntax errors in your code. However, everyone's forgotten to make their code python 3 compatible. I'd recommend getting in the habit of declaring classes as class c(object): so your code is portable. –  Ben Dec 3 '11 at 16:36
4  
Eh, everyone's pointing out things completely unrelated to the question. Generators? Classes? Python3? This question is about a for loop that calls a function OR a method, there is no difference in this case. If the fact the OP was calling a method threw him off, he should consult stackoverflow.com/questions/155609/…. –  Derek Litz Dec 3 '11 at 16:43
    
Thanks for keeping us grounded, @DerekLitz. :) –  Brian Cain Dec 3 '11 at 17:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
In [395]: def tester():
     ...:     print "Tester Called!"
     ...:     return [1,2,3]

In [396]: for i in tester():
     ...:     pass
Tester Called!

Seems the answer is no.

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c.f() will not get executed multiple times.

You didn't ask, but you might be curious about generators.

Your example as a generator would be as follows:

Class C():
  def f():
    yield 1
    yield 2
    yield 3

The loop where you iterate over the results would be unchanged.

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As much as I love them, generators are off topic here. They're subject to exactly the same rules. –  delnan Dec 3 '11 at 16:25
1  
Well, I'll accept that they're off topic (despite having answered OP's question). Must we be limited to "just the facts, ma'am"? –  Brian Cain Dec 3 '11 at 16:47

from the python docs:

The for statement is used to iterate over the elements of a sequence (such as a string, tuple or list) or other iterable object:

for_stmt ::=  "for" target_list "in" expression_list ":" suite
             ["else" ":" suite] 

The expression list is evaluated once; it should yield an iterable object.

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It will be executed only once. But there will be syntax errors in your code:

class , not Class
def f(self), not def f()

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Did you try to test it yourself? The answer to your question is NO.

Here is how you should have tested it. Moreover there were lot of flaws in your code. Check the self commented modified version below

>>> class C: #its class not Class and C not C()
    def f(self): #You were missing the self argument
        print "in f" #Simple Test to validate your query
        return [1,2,3]


>>> c=C()
>>> for i in c.f():
    print i


in f
1
2
3
>>> 

Though this example is trivial but still I will use this as an example to explain how we can leverage the power of functional programming of Python. What I will try to explain is called lazy evaluation or generator functions(http://docs.python.org/glossary.html#term-generator).

Consider the modified example

>>> class C: #its class not Class and C not C()
    def f(self): #You were missing the self argument
        print "in f" #Simple Test to validate your query
        for i in [1,2,3]:
            yield i #Generates the next value when ever it is requsted
        return #Exits the Generator


>>> c=C()
>>> for i in c.f():
    print i


in f
1
2
3
>>> 

Can you spot the difference?

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No it is executed once.

And your method is not correctly defined. Should have a self argument:

class C:
  def f(self):
    return [1,2,3]
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1  
And your class declaration is not correct. It should be class C(object): –  rubik Dec 3 '11 at 16:40
    
@rubik Only in python2 (well not strictly true but who uses old classes in new code anymore). Although in Python3 class C: is enough as well - that did take me some time to figure out as well though. –  Voo Dec 3 '11 at 16:51
    
yeah copy pasted initial code extract. you'r both right. I juste enhanced my sample –  gecco Dec 3 '11 at 16:55

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