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Consider this template:

template< typename T, typename RefT = T& >
class foo
{
    typedef const RefT const_ref_t;
    typedef const T&   another_const_ref_t;

    //...

};

I would assume that the types const_ref_t and another_const_ref_t would be equivalent. Both are const T&'s. Yet they are not. Alas, the following demonstration of their not-equivalence is fairly elaborate. It hinges on using dynamic_cast<> to check the type of of another class.

class abstractBase
{
public: virtual ~abstractBase() {}
};

template< typename T >
class otherClass : public abstractBase
{
};

template< typename T, typename RefT = T& >
class foo
{
    typedef const RefT const_ref_t;
    typedef const T&   another_const_ref_t;

public:
    void discover( abstractBase* p )
    {
        otherClass< const_ref_t >* a = 
            dynamic_cast< otherClass< const_ref_t >* >( p );
        otherClass< another_const_ref_t >* b = 
            dynamic_cast< otherClass< another_const_ref_t >* >( p );

        assert( a );    // Fails
        assert( b );    // Succeeds
    }
};

void fn()
{
    abstractBase* p = new otherClass< const int& >();
    foo< int > f;
    f.discover( p );   // Assertion on 'a' fails.
}

Sorry this is so complex, but it's a simplified version of the situation where I discovered the question.

The question, then, is this. This code treats const int&, foo< int >::const_ref_t, and foo< int >::another_const_ref_t as equivalent, which seems reasonable given the typedefs. Yet dynamic_cast<> only treats foo< int >::another_const_ref_t as equivalent to const int&. It will return null in the other (foo< int >::const_ref_t) case.

Why?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm guessing you already realize this, but for the benefit of other readers, I'll point out that although a == NULL in this version, a != NULL if you change typename RefT = T& to typename RefT = const T&. (At least, when I tried this in g++ 4.5.2.) –  ruakh Dec 3 '11 at 18:19
    
You can also test types at compile-time: ideone.com/mAc9u –  UncleBens Dec 3 '11 at 18:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Consider this:

typedef Foo T;
typedef T & TRef;
typedef T const & TCRef;

Now TRef is the same as Foo &, and TCRef is the same as const Foo &.

However, const TRef is the same as const (TRef) = const (Foo &), not (const Foo)&. But reference types are always constant, so the additional const doesn't add anything.

If you prefer the comparison with pointers: T& is essentially like T * const, so TRef const is like (T * const) const, which just collapses to T * const.

share|improve this answer
    
do you mean 'TCRef const is like (T* const) const' ? –  sashang Dec 3 '11 at 18:40
    
@sashang: No. TCRef is like T const * const, as is TCRef const. Adding a const to the reference type itself does nothing. –  Kerrek SB Dec 3 '11 at 18:41
    
I buy that. I suspected something like this was going on. But it raises a follow-up question: for defining a class template like foo above, is there any other way of setting reasonable default reference types than to add a third template parameter: template< typename T, typename RefT = T&, typename ConstRefT = const T& > class foo {...};? –  OldPeculier Dec 3 '11 at 19:46
1  
@Dimbleby: Use any of the std::remove_reference-like typetraits. –  Kerrek SB Dec 3 '11 at 19:54

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