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I'm in a class reviewing various languages and we're building a text parser with Lisp. I can get my Lisp program to do lots of different functions with numbers but I'm struggling with text. I want to just peek at the first character in a line to see if it contains a < then do something, but I can't seem to figure out how to go about this simple task. Here's my simple little code so far:

;;;Sets up the y.xml file for use
(setq file (open "c:\\temp\\y.xml"))

;;;Just reads one line at a time, (jkk file)
(defun jkk (x)
(read-line x)
)

;;;Reads the entire file printing each line, (loopfile file)
(defun loopfile (x)
(loop for line = (read-line x nil)
    while line do (print line))
)

This next part I tried to combine the loop with an if statement to see if it can find "<" and if so just print that line and skip any others which doesn't work. Any help with doing this really easy task would be greatly appreciated. Never used Lisp or any other functional language before, I'm used to using functions like crazy in my VB and Java projects but I don't have any decent reference materials for Lisp.

After this program is done we don't have to mess with Lisp anymore so I didn't bother to order anything. Trying Google Books.. starting to figure stuff out but this language is and old and tough one!

;;;Reads the entire file printing the line when < is found
(defun loopfile_xml (x)
(loop for line = (read-line x nil)

    while line do 
    (
        if(char= line "<")
            (print line)
    )
)
)

Thanks guys

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1  
I think it would better to ask such questions in your class. –  Rainer Joswig Dec 3 '11 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, Lisp is not C or Java - it has different indentation conventions:

;;;Sets up the y.xml file for use
(setq file (open "c:\\temp\\y.xml"))

;;;Just reads one line at a time, (jkk file)
(defun jkk (x)
  (read-line x))

;;;Reads the entire file printing each line, (loopfile file)
(defun loopfile (x)
  (loop for line = (read-line x nil)
        while line do (print line)))

and

;;;Reads the entire file printing the line when < is found
(defun loopfile_xml (x)
  (loop for line = (read-line x nil)
        while line
        do (if (char= line "<")
             (print line))))

I would also give the variables meaningful names. x is not meaningful.

The function char= works on characters. But both arguments in your code are strings. Strings are not characters. #\< is a character. Strings are also arrays, so you can get the first element of a string using the function aref.

If you want to check if a line is just <, then you can compare the line using the function string= with the string "<".

The documentation:

Lisp is old, but still used and it has a lot of interesting concepts.

To learn Lisp is actually not very tough. You can learn the basics of Lisp in a day. If you already know Java, you may need two or even three days.

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1  
Thanks Rainer, for the fast response. I know Lisp isn't an OO language or procedural. This class I'm in is weird. We're just covering a battery of 12 languages in 15 weeks. This is the first functional language I've tried so I appreciate the help. –  JKK Dec 3 '11 at 19:21
1  
Made some changes from char to string and I'm able to process the if now. Thank you very much! –  JKK Dec 3 '11 at 19:22
2  
JKK_1979, Common Lisp is a multi-paradigm language which can be used in OO or procedural style too. And here's a nice guide to formatting code in lisps: mumble.net/~campbell/scheme/style.txt –  naryl Dec 3 '11 at 19:23
    
Sounds good, I'll give it a go. Been reading and reading on Lisp stuff trying to absorb it as well as I can. Hard to break from the OO style of thinking for just a few weeks worth of assignments in the evening and coding VB and Java during the day LOL I appreciate it very much! –  JKK Dec 3 '11 at 19:26

To search for a character in a line of text, you could use position, with the char= function as your equality comparator.

Second, you MAY be better off collecting your file into a single string and search there.

Third, there's some excellent reference material available on the web, like the Common Lisp HyperStandard (link) and Peter Seibel's Practical Common Lisp.

share|improve this answer
1  
POSITION has by default EQL as the equality operator. EQL works for characters. –  Rainer Joswig Dec 3 '11 at 19:21
    
True. Although when I know I am comparing characters, I prefer to use char= as an annotation to the human reader. –  Vatine Dec 3 '11 at 19:22
1  
This annotation is not needed. All sequence functions work on strings by default. You are trying to document the common case. –  Rainer Joswig Dec 3 '11 at 19:37
    
I still prefer having it. It makes it rather unavoidably clear that we're expecting to compare characters (and as a side-effect, wanted or not, of signalling errors if we'd pass a non-character as the element we're looking for). –  Vatine Dec 3 '11 at 21:38

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