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NOTE: I've re-worded my question to clear up what I believe the problem is.

I've been getting a bit frustrated with jQuery on a demo I'm slapping together and was wondering if the following is just a limitation of jQuery's selector and search methods, or I'm just using it wrong.

Here's an example HTML block:

<div class='div_item'>
        <td class='list'>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text1</dt></dl>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text2</dt></dl>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text3</dt></dl>
        </td>
</div>
<div class='div_item'>
        <td class='list'>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div2 text1</dt></dl>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div2 text2</dt></dl>
          <dl><dt class="access_text">Div2 text3</dt></dl>
        </td>
</div>

Here's the jQuery 1.9.2 script:

$().ready(function(){
     $('.div_item'); // this is a 2 jQuery array, with no children
     $('.div_item').find('.access_text'); // This is empty, length 0, .div_item's children aren't populated. Like I was using .children()
     $('.div_item').find('.access_text').each(function() { // This doesn't work because the .div_item children aren't populated?
         alert($(this).innerText);
     }):
});

My question is, is there a reason why are the children in the $('.div_item') array objects not populated? If they're not populated, they can't be referenced, then can't be .find()'ed for properly. This is where I think my usage is the problem.

All the suggestions I've seen so far work for a flatter DOM. e.g. , but not for something that's further nested.

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closed as too localized by casperOne Dec 5 '11 at 3:22

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
And what is your question? Is there any code you have problems with? As it stands now you have not even stated your problem properly. If it is DOM related, it makes sense to post the HTML structure and some code. –  Felix Kling Dec 3 '11 at 19:01
    
It looks like he had no time to finish the question ^^ This is with XSB 3.2, not 3.3, and XSB 3. –  mash Dec 3 '11 at 19:04
1  
Clearly this was a mis-post. I hit enter while trying to change over from an older question I never submitted and it got posted by accident. Thanks for the -1, I appreciated it. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 19:12
1  
jsfiddle.net/p5Fqt –  Julien Roncaglia Dec 3 '11 at 19:15
    
I appreciate the pointer to jsFiddle, but the Chrome JS console is working fine as it is. My problem is the .each() doesn't include children and I was hoping someone would have a suggestion. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

Well you code is not really correct. .find() does not expect a function as parameter but a selector, a jquery object or a DOM element.

Looking at the value of this within your callback in the find method, it refers to the document, and not you <div> as you expect.

Here's a correct code:

$(document).ready(function(){
    // cannot use .children() because the <dt> are not direct children
    $('.div_item').find('.access_text').each(function() {
        alert(this.innerText);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's right, I meant find in both samples to be each. (I was re-typing the sample code, my mistake.) What I'm finding is that $('.div_item') is an array of those elements (good) but they don't possess any of the children needed to .find('.access_text'). e.g the $(this) or this has a childNodes length of 1, the <td> element. My understanding is that .find() should find all objects using the selector, even below 1 level of children. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 19:53
    
Honestly, i don't get what is the problem. $('.div_item').find('.access-text') will find all elements the div's subtree, even 50 levels below and even if you have .access-text within other .access-text ... –  Didier Ghys Dec 3 '11 at 20:07
    
See my edit of the question. I think I clarified it. Sorry for any confusion. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 20:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok!!! If anyone is curious and thought I've been crazy all this time, try testing it yourself. The above jQuery + the updated HTML sample WITH wrapping tags!

I was testing the divs within a table and it probably found a gap in the DOM parsing. I know that div's aren't supposed to be inserted in between and it's elements, but I never expected it to surprise me like this!

Here's the bad html that's fail the jQuery find: (no child elements)

<table>
    <div class='div_item'>
        <tr>
            <td class='list'>
              <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text1</dt></dl>
              <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text2</dt></dl>
              <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text3</dt></dl>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </div>
</table>

Here's how I adjusted it to work with jQuery:

<table>
        <tr class='div_item'>
            <td class='list'>
              <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text1</dt></dl>
                  <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text2</dt></dl>
              <dl><dt class="access_text">Div1 text3</dt></dl>
            </td>
        </tr>
</table>

The tr class is now found by the query. In the previous case, the div's children weren't populated, but the div's themselves were returned.

Very tricky...

Note that this was a sample and was adapted from my other work, so I appologize if there were any confusing typos.

share|improve this answer
    
Not very tricky to be honest.. your html was invalid, and browsers try to correct it so that they can render it ... Scripts will always be unreliable when running on invalid HTML.. Additionally, you cannot expect invalid javascript to run at all .. and in your original question the javascript is full of errors.. (and currently jQuery is at 1.7.1) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 3 '11 at 21:03
    
The tricky part of finding the reason for the problem, not knowing that a div in between the main elements of a table are invalid. Technically the old JS method of getElements... would have worked with this, invalid or not. So yes, invalid HTML, but no, tricky because of the pit falls of years of browsers letting invalid DOM get by. Ultimately my mistake. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 21:08
    
Oh and crap, yes. I was looking at the RubyMine library list for the version included and read the wrong version of jQuery. Man, I can't get anything right on a Saturday. –  garlicman Dec 3 '11 at 21:10

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