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The following algorithm has some bugs, i don't know how to fix it, i try but i can't fix it.

This algorithm return the 1nd and 2nd max value from a list.

Thanks for help.

maxmimum [] = []  
maxmimum [head] = [head] 
maxmimum [head1 : head2 : maradek] 
  | head1 > head2 = maxmimum2 maradek head1 head2 
  | otherwise = maxmimum2 maradek head2 head1

--maxmimum2 :: [Int] Int Int -> [Int]

maxmimum2 [] head1 head2 = [head1, head2] 
maxmimum2 [head : maradek] head1 head2    
  | head > head1 = maxmimum2 maradek head head1
  | head > head2 = maxmimum2 maradek head1 head
  | otherwise = maxmimum2 maradek head1 head2

Parse error in pattern: maxmimum

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First off, you probably want to give explicit type signatures because this isn't saying what you might think it's saying.

maxmimum [head1 : head2 : maradek] 

That says you have a list of lists. The outter list has a single element, which is itself a list of length at least two. The type is [[a]]. What you want, I expect, is maximum (head1 : head2 : restOfList) = ....

The same issue appears in maximum2 ([head : maradek] should be (head : maradek)). The type signature you have commented out for maximum2 is almost right (once you use this fix), you just need to add in the arrows (the function is curried): maximum2 :: [Int] -> Int -> Int -> [Int].

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i try with () before, but i try again, thank you –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 19:47
    
Thanks is works!!!!!!!!! –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 19:58
    
To reiterate, [head1 : head2 : ... ] is the same as [ [head1, head2, ...] ] while (head1 : head2 : ...) is [head1, head2, ...]. The : operator builds up a list and the surrounding [] builds another list. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Dec 3 '11 at 19:59
    
thank you, again –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 20:01
    
"maxmimum2 :: [Int] Int Int -> [Int]" this is important for the code? or just better to understand? –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 20:03
(reverse $ sort [1, 6, 2, 7 ,8]) !! 0
(reverse $ sort [1, 6, 2, 7 ,8]) !! 1
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If he's able to leverage larger library functions then you're right, just do take 2 . reverse . sort, but this is homework and he did have basically the correct answer. I think we should encourage him to continue developing what he has and understand what is wrong. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Dec 3 '11 at 19:53
    
Thanks, this is a good solution but not for the bug. –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 19:58
    
I just want to say it is easier to sort the list and get the first two member. He can sort by library function or create own sort function - it doesn't matter. –  demas Dec 3 '11 at 19:58
    
Thanks for help anyway. –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 20:05

First please write down type signatures like

maximum :: Ord a => [a] -> a

it makes thinking about functions way more easily. so in this case we have a function that takes a list of comparable things (Ord a => [a]) and gives us one - the maximum of them.

maximum :: Ord a => [a] -> a
maximum [] = undefined
maximum [x] = x
maximum (x1 : x2 : xs)
  | x1 > x2 = maximum (x1 : xs)
  | otherwise = maximum (x2 : xs)

Secondly name things so that others are not confused - i don't know what a maradek is or could be, in haskell often "list of x" is denoted by xs.

now let's test our maximum-function:

> ghci maximum.hs
>>> maximum []
*** Exception: Prelude.maximum: empty list
>>> maximum [1..10]
    10
>>> maximum [10,9..1]
    10
>>> maximum "alpha,beta,gamma"
    't'
>>> maximum [1.0,1.1..10.0]
    10.000000000000053

works all as expected: error on emptylist, maximum on integers and characters as well only the last one is unexpected as it is one of the oddities of working with floating point numbers and rounding errors.

Edit

After the comment I misread the op's question (I'm verry sorry for that!).

maximum2 :: Ord a => [a] -> (a,a)
maximum2 [] = undefined
maximum2 [x] = undefined
maximum2 [x1, x2] = (x1, x2)
maximum2 (x1 : x2 : x3 : xs)
  | x2 > x1 = maximum2 (x2 : x1 : x3 : xs)
  | x3 > x1 = maximum2 (x3 : x1 : xs)
  | x3 > x2 = maximum2 (x1 : x3 : xs)
  | otherwise = maximum2 (x1 : x2 : xs)

so here is the expected solution I hope.

> ghci maximum.hs
>>> maximum []
*** Exception: Prelude.maximum: empty list
>>> maximum2 [1..10]
    (10,9)
>>> maximum2 [10,9..1]
    (10,9)
>>> maximum2 [9,19,10,23]
    (23,19)
>>> maximum "alpha,beta,gamma"
    ('t','p')
>>> maximum [1.0,1.1..10.0]
    (10.000000000000053,9.900000000000052)
>>> maximum2 (10:[1..10])
    (10,10)

I don't know if the last result is as expected or if there should be (10,9).

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Thank you, nice algorithm. –  flatronka Dec 3 '11 at 21:10
    
i actually just copied your version and tidied it up a bit. –  epsilonhalbe Dec 3 '11 at 23:23
    
However, this doesn't produce the two highest numbers, which is apparently the problem OP was solving. –  Dan Burton Dec 4 '11 at 0:48
    
@Dan_Burton thank you for pointing this out to me. –  epsilonhalbe Dec 4 '11 at 2:36

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