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I have a class A that allocates memory in its constructor using new. What happens when I allocate a chunk of As and (while new[] is initializing the single As) one of them throws std::bad_alloc in their constructor?

Does operator new[] destruct the already initialized objects? Or is it my duty to make sure the constructor doesn't throw?

EDIT: The two invocations of new might sound confusing, so here's a piece of code to clarify:

class A
{
    int* mem;
public:
    A()
    {
        try
        {
            mem = new int[3];
        }
        catch(bad_alloc&)
        {
            throw 5;
        }
    }
    ~A()
    {
        delete[] mem;
    }
}

A* list = 0;

try
{
    list = new A[50000];
}
catch(int)
{
    // When I get here, did the new[] above call the destructors
    // of all the objects it managed to construct before one of them threw?
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you do new Foo() and the constructor of Foo throws, then the memory allocated by the relevant operator new will be freed. And if the constructor for any member of Foo has succeeded, that member's destructor will be called.

If you do new Foo[100], and the 42nd constructor throws, then all the already-constructed Foo objects are destroyed (in reverse order).

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I added some code, hope that clarifies it. –  pezcode Dec 3 '11 at 22:12
    
Yes, thanks. Edited my answer - although the short version is "yes". –  Alan Stokes Dec 3 '11 at 22:21

Yes, any objects already allocated will be deleted. Why not try it yourself?

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

class A {
    static int n;
public:
    A()
    {
        ++n;
        std::cout << "construncting A no. " << n << "...";
        // let's pretend we allocate something here
        // with new and it fails
        if (n == 5) {
            std::cout << std::endl;
            throw std::bad_alloc();
        }
        std::cout << "done\n";
    }
    ~A()
    {
        --n;
        std::cout << "destructed A no. " << n << "\n";
    }
};

int A::n = 0;

int main()
{
    try {
        A* a = new A[10];
    }
    catch (std::bad_alloc& e) {
        std::cout << "caught an exception!\n";
    }
}

However, the destructor of the instance which constructor threw will NOT be called (you can see that if you run the code above). Still, the members which were constructed by that point will be deleted. For example, if this constructor throws:

class foo {
    int i;
    bar* b;
public:
    foo() : i(42), b(new bar)
    {
        float f = 3.14;
        // something throws an exception here
    }
    ~foo()
    {
        delete b;
    }
};

i,b and f will be deleted, however memory that was allocated will not be freed (delete b doesn't get called) and you'll have a memory leak (using smart pointers will easily solve that).

Take a look at C++FaqLite for more info about this:

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/freestore-mgmt.html#faq-16.10

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.8

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Members will be destroyed. Automatic-duration variables in the constructor will go out of scope and be destroyed properly.

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Can you explain it in layman's terms? I'm not sure I fully understand. Thanks :) –  pezcode Dec 3 '11 at 22:14
    
@pezcode: "You're fine" is pretty simple. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 4 '11 at 3:41

If some fields has been successfully initialized with their constructors, destructors for they is called automatically

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