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I am using a const member function in a class.

Here is the syntax that I am using:

const Grid2D<T>* GetSlice(uint32_t z) const {
   return &(GetTSlice<Grid2D<T>>(z));
}

Here is the syntax of GetTSlice

template<class G>
    G GetTSlice(uint32_t z)
    {
        return (G*)(*this)[z];
    }

'G Grid3D<T>::GetTSlice<Grid2DReloaded<T>>(uint32_t)' : cannot convert 'this' pointer from 'const Grid3DReloaded<T>' to 'Grid3D<T> &'

Any idea what I could be doing wrong ?

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2  
You're right, there's something wrong. But for a better question, can you explain how you decided that? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 3 '11 at 21:13
    
I want to return a const pointer and am not sure how to do it. –  Kiran Dec 3 '11 at 21:21
    
You didn't answer my question. We can already see what you're trying to do, so repeating that is not helpful. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 3 '11 at 21:22
    
It's not obvious to me what you're trying to do. Can you post the definition of GetTSlice? –  ruakh Dec 3 '11 at 21:23
1  
@Kiran: It does not take a C++ expert to form a precise question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 4 '11 at 3:42

4 Answers 4

In addition to other already reported problems (pointer to temporary object, G* instead of G): method GetTSlice should be also const - otherwise you could not call it from the const methods like GetSlice.

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To add one more problem to the pile: the return type should be G const (or const G if you prefer) and the cast on the return should also include the const cast:

template<class G>
G const GetTSlice(uint32_t z)
{
    return *( (G const *)(*this)[z] );
}

The above should resolve most of the other problems. Check to make sure that the operator [] is also const otherwise, that will be another source of trying to mutate a constant.

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The function GetTSlice returns a G by signature, but you try to return a G*. Either change the function's return type to a pointer or return an object, whichever is appropriate to your intended design.

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You're returning the address of a temporary object, which is going to be destroyed once you leave the function.

Although adding error message or some such may turn out helpful.

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Are you sure that's the issue? Look at the method's return type, and compare it to the returned expression. I think GetTSlice is supposed to be another method, and if so, it's probably supposed to return by reference. –  ruakh Dec 3 '11 at 21:22
    
No, I'm not sure, it's just the likeliest explanation I could come up with having this little input. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 3 '11 at 21:27

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