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I am trying to load the name of an image using its VM address by calling GetModuleFileName() which seems to return the value correctly into a TCHAR[] array. I am able to display the data correctly using MessageBox() but cout << seems to display some funky hexadecimal number.

TCHAR buf[MAX_PATH];
HMODULE hProc = LoadLibrary(TEXT("kernel32.dll"));
GetModuleFileName(hProc, buf, MAX_PATH);
cout << buf; //Produces the odd number
MessageBox(NULL, buf, NULL, MB_OK); //Produces correct filepath
FreeLibrary(hProc);

Am I supposed to set a flag for cout so it knows to print it correctly? Thank you!

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In modern Windows programming (as of after the year 2000), don't use TCHAR. Use e.g. wchar_t. Then you know better what you're doing and what you're dealing with. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 3 '11 at 21:42
    
Out of curiosity, what is the difference? Compatibility? –  llk Dec 3 '11 at 21:45
    
TCHAR is a macro (pure text substitution) that is defined as either char or wchar_t, depending on whether the symbol UNICODE was defined when you included the relevant header, usually <windows.h>. Similarly, TEXT adds L prefix or not. This means that code that works with UNICODE defined, may and probably will not compile when UNICODE is not defined. The T scheme originally supported Windows 9x, but as of 2011 it is just a problematic extra layer of obfuscation. For example, it prevented you from knowing that you dealt with wchar_t. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 3 '11 at 22:52
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Probably you need to use wcout, because your TCHAR might be unicodish. Or convert it.

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Had a feeling it was something simple like that. Never knew about wcout until now, thanks! –  llk Dec 3 '11 at 21:42
    
Sorry, I haven't seen your answer, when posting mine.. and I cannot delete it, because I've already deleted 5 my posts today.... –  Beginner Dec 3 '11 at 21:44
    
You're forgiven ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 3 '11 at 21:44
    
Is there a tcout or something in Windows, that'd be cout for ANSI and wcout for Unicode? –  cHao Dec 3 '11 at 21:48
    
There should be no TCHAR instead :) Actually, I don't know, I don't use windows for eons now. If there's nothing like that, you can #define it, perhaps. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 3 '11 at 21:50
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Maybe you will have better luck with

std::wcout << buf;
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