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What is the fastest c# function that takes and int and returns a string containing a letter or letters for use in an Excel function? For example, 1 returns "A", 26 returns "Z", 27 returns "AA", etc.

This is called tens of thousands of times and is taking 25% of the time needed to generate a large spreadsheet with many formulas.

public string Letter(int intCol) {

    int intFirstLetter = ((intCol) / 676) + 64;
    int intSecondLetter = ((intCol % 676) / 26) + 64;
    int intThirdLetter = (intCol % 26) + 65;

    char FirstLetter = (intFirstLetter > 64) ? (char)intFirstLetter : ' ';
    char SecondLetter = (intSecondLetter > 64) ? (char)intSecondLetter : ' ';
    char ThirdLetter = (char)intThirdLetter;

    return string.Concat(FirstLetter, SecondLetter, ThirdLetter).Trim();
}
share|improve this question
1  
can you post your current function? Something as simple as this should not be 25% of your processing. – Neil N May 7 '09 at 21:40
    
See this question: <stackoverflow.com/questions/297213/…; – Joel Coehoorn May 8 '09 at 12:51
    
I'm not sure how fast my code would be. But it should be a darn site faster than the original code you posted. My code is posted at blackbeltcoder.com/Articles/strings/…. – Jonathan Wood Apr 12 '11 at 4:46
    
See also this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/181596/… – Erwin Mayer Nov 6 '14 at 9:47

19 Answers 19

I currently use this, with Excel 2007

public static string ExcelColumnFromNumber(int column)
        {
            string columnString = "";
            decimal columnNumber = column;
            while (columnNumber > 0)
            {
                decimal currentLetterNumber = (columnNumber - 1) % 26;
                char currentLetter = (char)(currentLetterNumber + 65);
                columnString = currentLetter + columnString;
                columnNumber = (columnNumber - (currentLetterNumber + 1)) / 26;
            }
            return columnString;
        }

and

public static int NumberFromExcelColumn(string column)
        {
            int retVal = 0;
            string col = column.ToUpper();
            for (int iChar = col.Length - 1; iChar >= 0; iChar--)
            {
                char colPiece = col[iChar];
                int colNum = colPiece - 64;
                retVal = retVal + colNum * (int)Math.Pow(26, col.Length - (iChar + 1));
            }
            return retVal;
        }

As mentioned in other posts, the results can be cached.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 : Might not be the fastest, but useful for the stuff I need to do :) – Ian Sep 7 '09 at 14:54
1  
Nice variant on conversion from one base to another! :) – Crisfole Jul 2 '12 at 20:11
    
Upvote for not searching in a string or character array – Stephan Feb 25 '15 at 9:30

I can tell you that the fastest function will not be the prettiest function. Here it is:

private string[] map = new string[]
    { 
        "A", "B", "C", "D", "E" .............
    };

public string getColumn(int number)
{
    return map[number];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
A good point to draw attention to the array approach, though defining it manually wouldn't be such a great idea. Pre-generation is the way to go. – Noldorin May 7 '09 at 21:50
2  
Hey, he asked for the fastest! Any code you add to automatically pre-populate it is going to be slower ;) – womp May 7 '09 at 21:55
    
@womp: This is true... though it's a one-off operation, so it's effectively discountable. What's the difference between generating the enormous array as code or during initialisation, except messiness? I know, you're just being pedantic and taking it literally for the fun of it (unless I'm mistaken). – Noldorin May 7 '09 at 21:58
    
Nope, you're right :) Clearly it would be MUCH more practical to pre-generate the array with some code. But this is technically the absolute fastest. Just for the record, I voted up some other answers ;) – womp May 7 '09 at 22:03
3  
By the way, this map should be static, so that it is not duplicated (and potentially regenerated) for each instance. – Thomas Levesque Jul 3 '09 at 8:20

Don't convert it at all. Excel can work in R1C1 notation just as well as in A1 notation.

So (apologies for using VBA rather than C#):

Application.Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("B1").Font.Bold = True

can just as easily be written as:

Application.Worksheets("Sheet1").Cells(1, 2).Font.Bold = True

The Range property takes A1 notation whereas the Cells property takes (row number, column number).

To select multiple cells: Range(Cells(1, 1), Cells(4, 6)) (NB would need some kind of object qualifier if not using the active worksheet) rather than Range("A1:F4")

The Columns property can take either a letter (e.g. F) or a number (e.g. 6)

share|improve this answer

You could pre-generate all the values into an array of strings. This would take very little memory and could be calculated on the first call.

share|improve this answer

This is written in Java, but it's basically the same thing.

Here's code to compute the label for the column, in upper-case, with a 0-based index:

public static String findColChars(long index) {
    char[] ret = new char[64];
    for (int i = 0; i < ret.length; ++i) {
        int digit = ret.length - i - 1;
        long test = index - powerDown(i + 1);
        if (test < 0)
            break;
        ret[digit] = toChar(test / (long)(Math.pow(26, i)));
    }
    return new String(ret);
}

private static char toChar(long num) {
    return (char)((num % 26) + 65);
}

Here's code to compute 0-based index for the column from the upper-case label:

public static long findColIndex(String col) {
    long index = 0;
    char[] chars = col.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; ++i) {
        int cur = chars.length - i - 1;
        index += (chars[cur] - 65) * Math.pow(26, i);
    }
    return index + powerDown(chars.length);
}

private static long powerDown(int limit) {
    long acc = 0;
    while (limit > 1)
        acc += Math.pow(26, limit-- - 1);
    return acc;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You have saved my sanity, thank-you – BrainStorm.exe Dec 10 '13 at 1:36
    
Umm... Your Convert back function has issues... It always returns -1 – BrainStorm.exe Dec 10 '13 at 1:45
    
Correction, it happens when the value from findColChars is passed into it. – BrainStorm.exe Dec 10 '13 at 2:07

Here's my version: This does not have any limitation as such 2-letter or 3-letter. Simply pass-in the required number (starting with 0) Will return the Excel Column Header like Alphabet sequence for passed-in number:

private string GenerateSequence(int num)
{
    string str = "";
    char achar;
    int mod;
    while (true)
    {
        mod = (num % 26) + 65;
        num = (int)(num / 26);
        achar = (char)mod;
        str = achar + str;
        if (num > 0) num--;
        else if (num == 0) break;
    }
    return str;
}

I did not tested this for performance, if someone can do that will great for others. (Sorry for being lazy) :)

Cheers!

share|improve this answer

Once your function has run, let it cache the results into a dictionary. So that, it won't have to do the calculation again.

e.g. Convert(27) will check if 27 is mapped/stored in dictionary. If not, do the calculation and store "AA" against 27 in the dictionary.

share|improve this answer

The absolute FASTEST, would be capitalizing that the Excel spreadsheet only a fixed number of columns, so you would do a lookup table. Declare a constant string array of 256 entries, and prepopulate it with the strings from "A" to "IV". Then you simply do a straight index lookup.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know where you are getting that Excel has a fixed 256 columns. I started scrolling and adding text, and I am on AEW and have given up. – esac May 7 '09 at 22:32
3  
It used to, before Excel 2007, which allows 16384 (XFD). Still, don't blame you for quitting. ;) – Matthew Flaschen May 8 '09 at 4:34
    
I'm running Office 2005. Apparently the 256 column limit has been extended (or lifted entirely?) in newer versions. Which, of course, makes it more important to programatically seed your lookup table. – Doug May 8 '09 at 17:07

Try this function.

// Returns name of column for specified 0-based index.
public static string GetColumnName(int index)
{
    var name = new char[3]; // Assumes 3-letter column name max.
    int rem = index;
    int div = 17576; // 26 ^ 3

    for (int i = 2; i >= 0; i++)
    {
        name[i] = alphabet[rem / div];
        rem %= div;
        div /= 26;
    }

    if (index >= 676)
        return new string(name, 3);
    else if (index >= 26)
        return new string(name, 2);
    else
        return new string(name, 1);
}

Now it shouldn't take up that much memory to pre-generate each column name for every index and store them in a single huge array, so you shouldn't need to look up the name for any column twice.

If I can think of any further optimisations, I'll add them later, but I believe this function should be pretty quick, and I doubt you even need this sort of speed if you do the pre-generation.

share|improve this answer
    
@esac: You're absolutely right. (And there was even another with the for loop. :P) I shouldn't be writing code at this hour, frankly... So yeah, that did deserve a downvote in fairness. Thanks for having the courtesy to remove it though. :) +1 to you for the corrections. – Noldorin May 7 '09 at 22:21
    
return new string(name, 3); there is no overload for string(char[], int). Maybe you meant "new string(name)". Also you get an index out of the bounds of the array exception for case index = (26 % 100) on the line name[i] = alphabet[rem / div]; (yes i have alphabet defined as earlier) – esac May 7 '09 at 22:22

Your first problem is that you are declaring 6 variables in the method. If a methd is going to be called thousands of times, just moving those to class scope instead of function scope will probably cut your processing time by more than half right off the bat.

share|improve this answer

@Neil N -- nice code I think the thirdLetter should have a +64 rather than +65 ? am I right?

public string Letter(int intCol) {

    int intFirstLetter = ((intCol) / 676) + 64;
    int intSecondLetter = ((intCol % 676) / 26) + 64;
    int intThirdLetter = (intCol % 26) + 65;  ' SHOULD BE + 64?

    char FirstLetter = (intFirstLetter > 64) ? (char)intFirstLetter : ' ';
    char SecondLetter = (intSecondLetter > 64) ? (char)intSecondLetter : ' ';
    char ThirdLetter = (char)intThirdLetter;

    return string.Concat(FirstLetter, SecondLetter, ThirdLetter).Trim();
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a concise implementation using LINQ.

static IEnumerable<string> GetExcelStrings()
{
    string[] alphabet = { string.Empty, "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z" };

    return from c1 in alphabet
           from c2 in alphabet
           from c3 in alphabet.Skip(1)                    // c3 is never empty
           where c1 == string.Empty || c2 != string.Empty // only allow c2 to be empty if c1 is also empty
           select c1 + c2 + c3;
}

This generates A to Z, then AA to ZZ, then AAA to ZZZ.

On my PC, calling GetExcelStrings().ToArray() takes about 30 ms. Thereafter, you can refer to this array of strings if you need it thousands of times.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the constraint based programming. It is great for some tasks!. Here's a lazy alphabet which might speed up the initial generation even more: var a = new string[] { "" }.Union(from c in Enumerable.Range((int)'A', 26) select Convert.ToString((char)c)); – nurettin Feb 28 '12 at 13:39
    
@pwned Although having a lazy data source can often reduce latency, in this case the creation of alphabet is near-instantaneous so I don't think it will help. A quick test with your amendment suggests that it slows down the total runtime (1000 repetitions went from 14 secs to over 20). – Matthew Strawbridge Feb 28 '12 at 18:51
    
I confirm. I was over eager. – nurettin Mar 7 '12 at 12:21

Caching really does cut the runtime of 10,000,000 random calls to 1/3 its value though:

    static Dictionary<int, string> LetterDict = new Dictionary<int, string>(676);
    public static string LetterWithCaching(int index)
    {
        int intCol = index - 1;
        if (LetterDict.ContainsKey(intCol)) return LetterDict[intCol];
        int intFirstLetter = ((intCol) / 676) + 64;
        int intSecondLetter = ((intCol % 676) / 26) + 64;
        int intThirdLetter = (intCol % 26) + 65;
        char FirstLetter = (intFirstLetter > 64) ? (char)intFirstLetter : ' ';
        char SecondLetter = (intSecondLetter > 64) ? (char)intSecondLetter : ' ';
        char ThirdLetter = (char)intThirdLetter;
        String s = string.Concat(FirstLetter, SecondLetter, ThirdLetter).Trim();
        LetterDict.Add(intCol, s);
        return s;
    }

I think caching in the worst-case (hit every value) couldn't take up more than 250kb (17576 possible values * (sizeof(int)=4 + sizeof(char)*3 + string overhead=2)

share|improve this answer

It is recursive. Fast, and right :

class ToolSheet
{


    //Not the prettyest but surely the fastest :
    static string[] ColName = new string[676];


    public ToolSheet()
    {
        ColName[0] = "A";
        for (int index = 1; index < 676; ++index) Recurse(index, index);

    }

    private int Recurse(int i, int index)
    {
        if (i < 1) return 0;
        ColName[index] = ((char)(65 + i % 26)).ToString() + ColName[index];

        return Recurse(i / 26, index);
    }

    public string GetColName(int i)
    {
        return ColName[i - 1];
    }



}
share|improve this answer

sorry there was a shift. corrected.

class ToolSheet
{


    //Not the prettyest but surely the fastest :
    static string[] ColName = new string[676];


    public ToolSheet()
    {

        for (int index = 0; index < 676; ++index)
        {
            Recurse(index, index);
        }

    }

    private int Recurse(int i, int index)
    {
        if (i < 1)
        {
            if (index % 26 == 0 && index > 0) ColName[index] = ColName[index - 1].Substring(0, ColName[index - 1].Length - 1) + "Z";

            return 0;
        }


        ColName[index] = ((char)(64 + i % 26)).ToString() + ColName[index];


        return Recurse(i / 26, index);
    }

    public string GetColName(int i)
    {
        return ColName[i - 1];
    }



}
share|improve this answer

My solution:

static class ExcelHeaderHelper
{
    public static string[] GetHeaderLetters(uint max)
    {
        var result = new List<string>();
        int i = 0;
        var columnPrefix = new Queue<string>();
        string prefix = null;
        int prevRoundNo = 0;
        uint maxPrefix = max / 26;

        while (i < max)
        {
            int roundNo = i / 26;
            if (prevRoundNo < roundNo)
            {
                prefix = columnPrefix.Dequeue();
                prevRoundNo = roundNo;
            }
            string item = prefix + ((char)(65 + (i % 26))).ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
            if (i <= maxPrefix)
            {
                columnPrefix.Enqueue(item);
            }
            result.Add(item);
            i++;
        }
        return result.ToArray();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

barrowc's idea is much more convenient and fastest than any conversion function! i have converted his ideas to actual c# code that i use:

  var start = m_xlApp.Cells[nRow1_P, nCol1_P];
  var end = m_xlApp.Cells[nRow2_P, nCol2_P];
  // cast as Range to prevent binding errors
  m_arrRange = m_xlApp.get_Range(start as Range, end as Range);
  object[] values = (object[])m_arrRange.Value2;
share|improve this answer

Why don't we try factorial?

public static string GetColumnName(int index)
{
    const string letters = "ZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXY";

    int NextPos = (index / 26);
    int LastPos = (index % 26);
    if (LastPos == 0) NextPos--;

    if (index > 26)
        return GetColumnName(NextPos) + letters[LastPos];
    else
        return letters[LastPos] + "";
}
share|improve this answer
private String columnLetter(int column) {
    if (column <= 0) 
        return "";
    if (column <= 26){
        return (char) (column + 64) + "";
    }

    if (column%26 == 0){
        return columnLetter((column/26)-1) + columnLetter(26) ;        
    }

    return columnLetter(column/26) + columnLetter(column%26) ;        
}
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