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I have these 3 links in my code:

<ul>
<li><a id="link1" href="#">link 1</a></li>
<li><a id="link2" href="#">link 2</a></li>
<li><a id="link3" href="#">link 3</a></li>
</ul>

This is how I write the ajax request for each link (as you can see the same code is multiple 3 times for each link - and I want to know how to avoid that)

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("a#link1").click(function() {
        $.get("anothertest.php?q=1", function(data){
            $("#phpTestAlon").html(data);
        });
    });
    $("a#link2").click(function() {
        $.get("anothertest.php?q=2", function(data){
            $("#phpTestAlon").html(data);
        });
    });
    });
    $("a#link3").click(function() {
        $.get("anothertest.php?q=3", function(data){
            $("#phpTestAlon").html(data);
        });
    });
});

What is the way to create this code but without the multiple duplications to make it more efficient? Is there a way to write it like this?:

$.get("anothertest.php?q=" + theIDofTheElement, function(data){

thanks, Alon

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Add a data-id attribute to your link and use one piece of JS:

<ul>
    <li><a id="link1" href="#" data-id="1">link 1</a></li>
    <li><a id="link2" href="#" data-id="2">link 2</a></li>
    <li><a id="link3" href="#" data-id="3">link 3</a></li>
</ul>

$("ul li a").click(function() {
    var idToSend = $(this).data('id');

    $.get("anothertest.php?q=" + idToSend, function(data){
        $("#phpTestAlon").html(data);
    });
});

This example uses data-id, but you could use any attribute you wanted, including id="". Another sensible option would be rel="".

Notice the selector has changed to ul li a so as to capture all <a> clicks in one event.

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Why not just put the url in href and not use any data-*? –  Amir Raminfar Dec 3 '11 at 23:10
    
@AmirRaminfar Because then the browser thinks the <a> points to http://thedomain/1 if we have href="1"; it treats it as a normal link. –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:13
    
Not not at all what I mean. Look at my answer. I would put the whole url in the href like so href="anothertest.php?q=2". Less code. Better usability. Still works if js is disabled. Every body is happy. –  Amir Raminfar Dec 3 '11 at 23:14
    
@AmirRaminfar Because then the link would just redirect to a new page. The OP is asking about AJAX. –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:17
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 var  theIDofTheElement = $(this).attr('id').match(/\d$/)[0];
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This is a solution to the problem the OP is describing, but it's better to solve the cause of the problem, than work around the problem itself. No disrespect, just some friendly advice :-) –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:22
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You can do

$("ul li a").click(function() {
        e.preventDefault()
        $.get(this.href, function(data){
            $("#phpTestAlon").html(data);
        });
    });

With this HTML:

<ul>
<li><a id="link1" href="anothertest.php?q=1">link 1</a></li>
<li><a id="link2" href="anothertest.php?q=2">link 2</a></li>
<li><a id="link3" href="anothertest.php?q=3">link 3</a></li>
</ul>

It is important that this solution also works if javascript is disabled. return false will make sure if js is enabled to not actually go to a different page. But if js was disabled, then the user would just go to whatever linked they clicked on.

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return false is bad. Why aren't you using e.preventDefault()? –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:17
    
Why is it bad? I actually find this easier to read. –  Amir Raminfar Dec 3 '11 at 23:19
    
It's bad, and it isn't; I don't see e.preventDefault() anyehere in your answer. –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:21
    
I respectfully disagree with that answer. I prefer have jQuery cancel the event instead of me. –  Amir Raminfar Dec 3 '11 at 23:23
    
Using e.preventDefault(), jQuery does cancel the event for you. What do you mean by have jQuery cancel the event instead of me? Edit: It doesn't cancel the event; the code inside the handler still executes, it just stops the default behaviour of the event. –  Bojangles Dec 3 '11 at 23:25
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