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Okay, so I was trying to resize an array as follows :

if((editBufferCounter + 20) > editBufferSize)
{
    char* temp;
    temp = new char[editBufferSize + 5];

    strcpy(temp, editBuffer);

    delete[] editBuffer;

    editBufferSize *= 2;  

    editBuffer = new char[editBufferSize];

    strcpy(editBuffer, temp);

    delete[] temp;

}

The last line delete[] temp causes a memory problem. The program simply crashes. I can't seem to get what the problem here is.

Note: The program runs fine if i remove the line delete[] temp;

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4  
Any reason you mess around with char* instead of std::string? –  Beginner Dec 4 '11 at 1:39
1  
how do you get the value of editBufferSize? It's possible you're dealing with heap corruption (strcpy?) –  pezcode Dec 4 '11 at 1:44
2  
Why the double copy? Just allocate twice the size, copy, free, and set the pointer to the new memory. –  Kerrek SB Dec 4 '11 at 1:45
1  
There is something you are not showing us which causes your program to crash. –  FailedDev Dec 4 '11 at 1:46
2  
Your code is not safe, even after the fix suggested by the accepted answer. What happens if either call to new throws? –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 4 '11 at 2:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do your editBuffer have a terminating NUL character? if not, please replace strcpy with strncpy.

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I just tried it with memcpy and it worked. Is there any advantage of strncpy over memcpy? –  devjeetroy Dec 4 '11 at 1:54
1  
strncpy copies no more than n characters and memcpy just copies n bytes. –  arnkore Dec 4 '11 at 2:01
    
Yeah, I'm aware of that. Since size of char is one byte, is there any other difference? –  devjeetroy Dec 4 '11 at 2:04
    
When your process undefined length c strings, every time you process a c string, your must adjust the lenght with memcpy. when process character array memcpy may copy some useless bytes, but strncpy doesn't. It means strncpy more flexible than memcpy , and more secure than strcpy. –  arnkore Dec 4 '11 at 2:22
1  
@arnkore: strncpy has to check for a null-character and zero-pad the destination so it does as much work as memcpy. For copying blocks of memory, like devjeetroy's buffer, memcpy will typically be faster. –  Blastfurnace Dec 4 '11 at 2:32

You function can be simplified to:

if ((editBufferCounter + 20) > editBufferSize)
{
    char* temp = new char[editBufferSize * 2];

    std::copy_n(editBuffer, editBufferSize, temp);

    delete[] editBuffer;

    editBufferSize *= 2;  

    editBuffer = temp;
}
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