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I have a problem with long numbers in prepared statement. Here is the code:

String removeCltQry = "DELETE * FROM Clients WHERE client_id = ?";
long client_id = 10;
Connection con = null;
PreparedStatement pstm = null;

try {
    con = DBMngerST.instance().getDBCon();
    pstm = con.prepareStatement(removeCltQry);
    pstm.setLong(1, client_id);
    pstm.executeUpdate();
    pstm.close();
} catch (SQLException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if (con != null) {
        try {
            con.close();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Here is the stack trace:

java.sql.SQLException: [Microsoft][ODBC Microsoft Access Driver]Optional feature not implemented
at sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbc.createSQLException(Unknown Source)
at sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbc.standardError(Unknown Source)
at sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbc.SQLBindInParameterBigint(Unknown Source)
at sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcPreparedStatement.setLong(Unknown Source)
at testingPack.test5.main(test5.java:25)

How is this caused and how can I solve it?

share|improve this question
    
Which line is line 25? –  Ted Hopp Dec 4 '11 at 1:54
    
And exactly, what JDBC driver are you using? which version? –  Óscar López Dec 4 '11 at 1:56
    
It appears to be saying that the MS version of setLong isn't implemented. Have you tried setInt(1, (int)client_id)? Can you really have a client_id value larger that 2 billion? –  Hot Licks Dec 4 '11 at 2:29
    
Yes i tried setInt, setString and evrething is ok. But the problem is in setLong... –  Glebus Dec 4 '11 at 2:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From what I can understand, "Optional feature not implemented" typically happens if there is a mismatch between the ODBC driver's capabilities and the JDBC-ODBC bridge's expectations. In this case, it looks like there is a mismatch between the setLong call and effective data type that is being used on the Access side.

My advice would be to check that the MS Access / ODBC type you are using is truly compatible with long; i.e. that all theoretically representable values are representable as Java long values. If changing the schema doesn't work, then your best bet is to treat the number as an int or String from the Java / JDBC side.

(Bear in mind that you are using MS Access which isn't a "real" database, and that the MS Access ODBC drivers could have functionality limitations. It is also worth checking for new versions of the drivers and the bridge libraries.)

share|improve this answer

I want to know what the version is of your Java. It seems that this exception is caused by the absence implementation of setLong in the PrepareStatement class.

Moreover, it may be a bug caused by the old implementation. You can see some comments in the method of setLong, just refer to hereenter link description here.

share|improve this answer
    
I have JDK 6.0.27 –  Glebus Dec 4 '11 at 3:34

Try putting the id right in the query, something like this.

String removeCltQry = "DELETE * FROM Clients WHERE client_id = 10";

long client_id = 10;

Connection con = null;
PreparedStatement pstm = null;

try {
con = DBMngerST.instance().getDBCon();
pstm = con.prepareStatement(removeCltQry);

//pstm.setLong(1, client_id);
pstm.executeUpdate();
pstm.close();


} catch (SQLException e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
  if (con != null) {
    try {
       con.close();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
       e.printStackTrace();
    }
   }
 }// finally
share|improve this answer
1  
That might be OK for debugging purposes, but is such a bad, bad practice building queries with wired parameters! –  Óscar López Dec 4 '11 at 2:02
1  
Well, it would be OK if the user's code really has client_id hard-coded like that. But I assume that's just scaffolding. –  Hot Licks Dec 4 '11 at 2:30
    
Thanks Robert, but i need it in Prepared Statement... And in this way i have a problem. –  Glebus Dec 4 '11 at 2:34
    
@ÓscarLópez I agree that's not good practice but as Hot Licks points out it's basically a wire parameter and secondly at this point it is a debugging thing in order to figure out what's going on. I wouldn't recommend this for a permanent solution. –  Robert Dec 4 '11 at 3:28

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