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I'm attempting to find out how to use sh -c or bash -c properly.

I can easily run a simple command like "sh -c ls" without arguments.

The problem comes when I'm trying to add in arguments. To do ls -ltga, I've had to do:

sh -c "ls -ltga"

This wouldn't be a big issue, except I'm attempting to write my own small shell program, and when I use execve I try:

Argument #:  string
         0:  sh
         1:  -c
         2:  "ls
         3:  -ltga"

And it gives me an error, saying that it reached an EOF before finding the next '"'

I've also tried:

         0:  sh
         1:  -c
         2:  "ls -ltga"

and it returned to me saying that it couldn't find the file/script named "ls -ltga"

Does anybody know what I am doing wrong?

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closed as off topic by Will Jan 29 '13 at 15:03

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1  
Have you tried 2: ls -ltga? –  Beginner Dec 4 '11 at 2:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You shouldn't put quotes inside arguments of execve(). It should be called like this:

char *args = { "sh", "-c", "ls -ltga", 0};
execve("/bin/sh", args);

The first argument to execve() must be the path to the executable (usually a full path).

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When I don't use the quotes, all of the arguments for the command get ignored, both inside the shell, and with execve. –  Serge Dec 4 '11 at 2:12
    
@StefanZuefeldt: The shell uses quotes to "group" the arguments. execve doesn't need that; the grouping is handled implicitly, by each argument being a separate array element. Specifying "ls -ltga" as one of the arguments via execve is like specifying '"ls -ltga"' as one of the arguments inside the shell. –  ruakh Dec 4 '11 at 2:23
    
While technically this was the answer that solved my issue, every answer here was extremely helpful! Thank you all very much! –  Serge Dec 4 '11 at 4:30

The notation the shell expects is sh -c "command plus arguments". So, what you're doing as a 'workaround' is in fact what the shell demands.

The alternative is to use execvp() to run ls:

char *args[] = { "ls", "-lgta", 0 };
execvp(args[0], args);
fprintf(stderr, "Oops: failed to find 'ls'\n");
exit(1);

I also need to be able to run commands with regular expressions, such as "rm *.c", but that fails to run within execve() (most cases), so I am attempting to work around that failure by passing the entire command set to "sh -c" instead. Any ideas?

If you want metacharacter expansion, you have to invoke the shell to do it (or write equivalent code to do it - which is possible and not too dreadfully hard to do with standard POSIX functions).

To run 'rm *.c', use:

char *args[] = { "/bin/sh", "-c", "rm *.c", 0 };
execv(args[0], args);

Or, if you have an environment you need to pass specifically (I assume it is pointed to by envp):

char *args[] = { "/bin/sh", "-c", "rm *.c", 0 };
execve(args[0], args, envp);

Don't forget the error handling after the exec* function call; it can fail.

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I also need to be able to run commands with regular expressions, such as "rm *.c", but that fails to run within execve (most cases), so I am attempting to work around that failure by passing the entire command set to "sh -c" instead. Any ideas? –  Serge Dec 4 '11 at 2:17

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