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Class:

Class:
  private:
    ...
    vector<string> words; 
    vector< list<int> > vints;
  public:
    myFunction(...)

I am calling a sort on non-empty list in another member function:

void myClass::myFunction (...) {
    ...
    if (!vints[i].empty()) vints[i].sort(sortFunc);
    ...
}

My sorting function:

bool myClass::sortFunc(const int& i, const int& j) { return (words[i] < words[j]); }

The Error:

error: no matching function for call to ‘std::list<int, std::allocator<int>      >::sort(<unresolved overloaded function type>)’
/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/list.tcc:301: note: candidates are: void std::list<_Tp,     _Alloc>::sort() [with _Tp = int, _Alloc = std::allocator<int>]
/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/list.tcc:378: note:                 void std::list<_Tp, _    Alloc>::sort(_StrictWeakOrdering) [with _StrictWeakOrdering = bool (SuperWordSearch::*)    (const int&, const int&), _Tp = int, _Alloc = std::allocator<int>]

I have researched and come across the following questions:

C++ Custom compare function for list::sort

Problem sorting a list of pointers

Error in std::list::sort with custom comparator (expected primary-expression before ')' token)

and they would have been sufficient had it not been for the fact that in this class, the sortFunc depends on the member variable WORDS for that instance of the object. So I cannot make the comparator function (sortFunc) static or global

EDIT: Just came across this How to sort a std:list when you need member data? and it provides a solution by making a friend class, but is it possible to accomplish this inside the user-defined class itself?

share|improve this question
    
Please don't use all uppercase identifiers (except for macros, where you should use them). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 4 '11 at 3:09
    
Fixed. Was trying to make the relevant info stand out. –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 3:12
    
Is this C++11? Can you use lambdas or bind()? –  Kerrek SB Dec 4 '11 at 3:15
1  
¤ The basic idea is to pass an object that has an operator() so that it can be used as function. That's called a functor. In C++11 you can create such a beast on the fly, as a "lambda". In C++98/03 you have to either define a class for it, or use some third party library such as Boost. E.g. you can use boost::bind to have a pointer to your words, passed to your real function. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 4 '11 at 3:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Kerrek's answer involving lambdas is better. But, if you must avoid C++11 features, then replace your sort function with a functor. Allow that functor to store a reference to whatever data is required, as so:

#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <string>

class myClass {
private:
  std::vector<std::string> words;
  std::vector<std::list<int> > vints;

  // Instead of sortFunc, use sortFunctor. A functor can be used in place 
  // of a function in many places, and it can carry state (like a reference
  // to the data it needs).
  struct sortFunctor {
    const std::vector<std::string>& words;
    sortFunctor(const std::vector<std::string>& words) : words(words) { }
    bool operator()(int i, int j) { return words[i] < words[j]; }
  };

public:
  void myFunction() {
    vints[0].sort(sortFunctor(words));
  }
  myClass() {
    words.push_back("apple");
    words.push_back("berry");
    std::list<int> l;
    l.push_back(0);
    l.push_back(1);
    vints.push_back(l);
  }
};

int main () {
  myClass object;
  object.myFunction();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can't beat the classiness of lambdas, but that requires a C++11 which I currently cannot use. –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 6:42

With lambdas:

vints[i].sort([&words](int i, int j) { return words[i] < words[j]; });

With std::bind:

#include <functional>

//...
{
  using namespace std::placeholders;
  vints[i].sort(std::bind(&myClass::sortFunc, this, _1, _2));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is it impossible to solve this without C++11 features? –  kol Dec 4 '11 at 3:27
    
@kol: You have to spell out the predicate yourself. Every lambda can trivially be expanded into a functor; it's just noisy. Do you need help with that? –  Kerrek SB Dec 4 '11 at 3:31
    
Hrm... I'm getting the following errors trying the bind method (Ubuntu linux x64, g++ v.4.4.3:) error: ‘placeholders’ is not a namespace-name error: expected namespace-name before ‘;’ token error: ‘bind’ is not a member of ‘std’ error: ‘_1’ was not declared in this scope error: ‘_2’ was not declared in this scope –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 3:41
    
@Kerrek SB: Thanks, forgot the specify the std. @ Rob: I'm not sure what you are referring to. –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 3:57

=== UPDATED ===

Here is a workaround without using C++11 features:

#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class MyClass
{
private:
  vector<string*> words;
  vector< list<string*> > vptrs;
  static bool sortFunc(const string* s1, const string* s2)
  {
    return (*s1 < *s2);
  }
public:
  MyClass()
  {
    vptrs.push_back(list<string*>());
  }
  ~MyClass()
  {
    for (int i = 0; i < vptrs.size(); ++i)
      vptrs[i].clear();
    for (int i = 0; i < words.size(); ++i)
      delete words[i];
  }
  void addWord(const char* s)
  {
    words.push_back(new string(s));
  }
  void setWord(int i, const char* s)
  {
    *words[i] = s;
  }
  void addIndex(int i, int j)
  {
    vptrs[i].push_back(words.at(j));
  }
  void sort(int i)
  {
    if (!vptrs[i].empty())
      vptrs[i].sort(sortFunc);
  }
  void print(int i)
  {
    list<string*>::iterator s;
    for (s = vptrs[i].begin(); s != vptrs[i].end(); ++s)
      cout << **s << endl;
  }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  try
  {
    MyClass* c = new MyClass();
    c->addWord("apple");
    c->addWord("hello");
    c->addWord("world");
    c->addIndex(0, 1);
    c->addIndex(0, 2);
    c->addIndex(0, 0);
    c->setWord(2, "pear");
    cout << "Before sort:" << endl;
    c->print(0);
    c->sort(0);
    cout << "After sort:" << endl;
    c->print(0);
    delete c;
  }
  catch (exception e)
  {
    cout << e.what() << endl;
  }
  getchar();
  return 0;
}

I omitted range checking for the sake of simplicity. Output:

Before sort:
hello
pear
apple
After sort:
apple
hello
pear
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I had originally, but since the strings can change, they change memory locations. It was a pain to find that bug. –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 3:53
    
I updated my answer. Now it is possible to change the strings in words. –  kol Dec 4 '11 at 4:34
    
Thanks for the method. I understand what you meant but that would require another re-re-factor of my program, whereas Robs solution would not. –  encore2097 Dec 4 '11 at 6:39

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